THRIVE ‌ Health 

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The College of Charleston has long been recognized for its multitude of good-looking ladies. However, a recent study conducted in national men’s magazine Men’s Health suggests the school’s fellas shouldn’t be overlooked. According to a survey administered in October, CofC guys rank 18th out of the top 20 fittest colleges in the nation. We venture to guess it has something to do with that terrific 6 to 1 female to male enrollment ratio. They say sex is the best exercise, and with those odds, CofC guys can work out six days a week and rest on the seventh.

COOKIN' NATURALLY
“Our goal is to show people that cooking is not hard and that natural foods taste really great,” says Margaret Grant, the community coordinator at Earth Fare, where weekly cooking classes provide an excellent opportunity to not only try natural ingredients but learn how to create new recipes. “Occasionally we have a guest chef, but generally our culinary specialist Kim Ortego leads the lessons,” says Grant. Classes range from the humorous “Ham it Up” in which Ortego shows guests how to prepare decadent ham croquettes, to the health-conscious, like their “gluten-free” class aimed at assisting those with celiac disease in finding wheat, barley, and oat alternatives. Classes are hands-on and always include sample tastings; for more info, call 769-4800.

Upcoming Classes:

• Thurs. April 13, 6:30 p.m.: Lamb-tastic — Chef Kim Ortego’s Grilled Boneless Lemon Garlic Leg of Lamb and Fresh Spring Asparagus.
• Thurs. April 27, 6:30 p.m.: Be an Environmental
Gourmet — Celebrate Earth Day and get tips on saving energy
and reducing waste in the kitchen.

OH THE PLACES YOU'LL GO
St. Augustine said, “The world is like a book and those who don’t travel only read one page.” As the holy one suggested, sometimes the best way to nourish one’s soul is to escape the routine and get out of Dodge. But if the idea of traveling evokes images of crowded motor coaches, group tours, and gimmicky overpriced souvenirs, then think again. Mt. Pleasant’s Breakaway Adventures has the anti-tourist trip for you. The company specializes in independent walking and cycling tours all over the world. From “Pedaling in Pafos’”to ascending Mt. Kilimanjaro, you can select either an independent or guided tour. The company maps out (in detail) your route, secures accommodations, and transports your luggage while you bike or stroll your way through foreign lands.
To find out more, go to www.breakaway-adventures.com or call 1-800-567-6286.


FREUDIAN SLIP
This year marks what would have been Sigmund Freud’s 150th birthday. Celebrate by pouring your heart out to the father of psychoanalysis any time after purchasing your own Freud action figure at Atomic Comics (451 King St., 534-2866).



When you hear the word “therapy,” typically images of couches and long-winded confessionals come to mind. Don’t get us wrong, that’s a very valid option. But if you’re looking to expose your psyche by other means, Mt. Pleasant therapist Diane Tennyson has just the thing for you. Tennyson leads patients in art therapy. “It’s all about creating artwork and letting the artwork speak,” she says. With degrees in nursing and art and a master’s degree in art education, Tennyson gained clinical experience as an art therapist working with patients in Fenwick Hall Hospital, a psychiatric and substance abuse hospital in Charleston. In her private practice, clients use a variety of mediums from paints to clay to torn bits of paper to suggest certain issues they’re facing. Sessions can be one-on-one or in groups and the artwork produced is kept completely confidential. “It’s 100 percent self-discovery,” says Tennyson. There are over a dozen art therapists in the Lowcountry, but Tennyson has the only private practice. Interested individuals can find out more by calling 884-9479 or going to www.artconnects.us .
Above artwork is original and is shown here with verbal and written permission.

 

 


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