ske 
Member since Apr 16, 2010


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Re: “Sowing the seeds of the food revolution

We love the Food Revolution and want to be a part of it! MetroTech High School (Phoenix, Arizona) has a one-of-a-kind student meal program that deserves a closer look. We’d love the opportunity to tell you more about it.
Our program makes 1,500 meals a day for our students where the meals are actually made by our students. The MetroTech START program teaches culinary skills to special needs students through the real preparing and serving of all the cafeteria’s meals. We are the only special education vocational program like it the country. We have three teachers, two aides and 45 special education students working together every day to serve 600 breakfast and 900 lunch meals. You have to see it to believe it but it is happening every day!
How does this support your vision of serving nutritious and satisfying meals to our students? We serve fresh and healthy meals prepared under the direction of an industry trained chef that also has been trained in vocational secondary education. He is partnered with two special education teachers who guide the learning of the students. So, when Alice (the cafeteria worker) in Huntington High School says, “It can’t be done without more staff”, we can prove that she’s wrong and show the world how it is being done every day.
We have already started down this path making our school a great example to others. MetroTech High School has been selected to participate in the, “Dr. Oz Healthy Campus” initiative. This purpose of this initiative is to create healthier lifestyles for both students and teachers. We are getting the support of experts to motivate us to exercise more and choose more nutritious meals. The lunch program is integral to this effort. How does the joining the Food Revolution fit in? You can help us use the resources available to us to make our school meals even more satisfying and nutritious while keeping within the federal guidelines for school lunches.
If you haven’t already decided to let us join the movement, we have one more unique component to our campus. Metro Tech High School is in the process of transitioning our campus into a “green” or sustainable campus. We are finding ways to increase recycling, using green-friendly cleaning products, and turning off lights and computers after work hours. We are working on ways to eliminate Styrofoam from the campus and replace with biodegradable tableware and flatware. And, the White House isn’t the only place with a garden! We have our own horticulture program on campus where students are learning how to grow and maintain healthy gardens. We want to incorporate the produce from this program into our student lunch program. We believe this fits perfectly into your vision of a high school campus and we could use your help to make it a reality.
One more tidbit…Metro Tech is a vocational high school where many students from other high schools in our district come to learn a vocational trade. We touch a portion of all the student population within the Phoenix Union High School District through these vocational programs. So, if you choose to come, you have the opportunity to reach the 26,000 families in our school community. A community that is struggling to embrace healthier lifestyle changes due to many cultural, ethnic and financial obstacles. Help us find ways to sustain more than just a healthy lunch menu but change our community and its future.
In healthful partnership,

Special Education Teacher's
MetroTech START Program

Posted by ske on April 16, 2010 at 12:24 AM
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