Nosh Mobbers get a lesson on the history of wine 

Viticulture Vultures

Wednesday may have been Bastille Day, but a small crowd of Nosh Mobbers at Muse had an Italian state of mind. Muse owner Beth Ann Crane is a true wine expert — her masters thesis at the University of Pennsylvania focused on Italian studies and Roman viticulture, and eventually inspired her to open her Mediterranean restaurant in a single house on Society Street.

As we sipped three different varieties of wine, Beth Ann took us on a whirlwind tour through the history of Italian wine production. She spoke quickly about the Villa of Mysteries in Pompeii and how the Vesuvius eruption changed the course of wine production in Italy — between the frequent Italian words and the intoxicating wine, we could barely keep up. Along with the three wines, we sampled two Italian cheeses — a salty pecorino and a smoother caciocavallo, which translates to “cheese on horseback” thanks to its unique production process.

After Crane’s speech, guests wandered around the upstairs of the restaurant, admiring the details of each room, decorated to reflect various muses. Noshers also had the option of indulging in a three-course dinner with even more wine tastings. The menu included a caprese salad with heirloom tomatoes and fresh mozzarella, lamb tenderloin with eggplant ravioli, and a chocolate tart. Our sources tell us it was delicious.

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