Jason Groce's Big Whatever is a sketch show full of just a little bit of everything 

Whatevs, am I right?

click to enlarge jasongrocesbigwhatever.jpg

Jason Groce cannot talk to me on the phone because he's hurt himself. I wonder, of course, if I did something wrong. An injury too severe for conversation? But, alas, Groce tells me that he has somehow "managed to punch a hole" in his lip. He hopes to be better by this Saturday.

Groce's name should be familiar to most folks aware of Charleston's comedy scene. He, like so many other Comedy Fest acts, got his start at Theatre 99. As he says (via email, of course): "It's a good way for all those people who think they're funny to actually get a feel for it." Groce's also performed as part of local sketch/variety show, RIP City, and has opened for big names like Tig Nataro and Colin Quinn. He regularly does improv at Theatre 99 on the weekends and consistently posts cute pictures of his pit bull on Facebook.

Groce describes his comedy style as "dry" and adds some other adjectives like "weird," "cerebral," and "silly." Jason Groce's Big Whatever is a loosely scripted sketch show — that loose part refers to Groce's interaction with the audience, which is totally unscripted. For a taste of Groce's sense of humor, you only have to look to a recent Facebook post encouraging people to vote by suggesting: "Groce 2018." This candidate's qualities include: dependable, honest, hard working, grammar Nazi, and dat ass tho.

Speaking of social media: Groce says he draws a lot of inspiration from the stuff people post online. "Facebook neighborhood pages and online reviews are amazing to me, still," he says. "Even people who abhor social media will find it funny because I take advantage of the unbridled drama inherent in it."

Audience members can also look forward to R&B singing: "But, like, the '70s and '80s kind of R&B/soul where they used to just talk for a good portion of the song." And, if they're lucky, some poetry. "There will be poetry, but I don't parody it, I just write funny poems that feel like serious poems." —Connelly Hardaway


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