Dish Restaurant Guide

Winter 2017

Halls Chophouse

Sometimes you get surprises from the most unexpected of places. Take for instance this issue. For this latest round of Dish, I asked Chef Jacques Larson and his wife Carrie to guest edit. Shockingly, they agreed and immediately ran with the theme Slow Food. But the real surprise came in the quality of the content they curated. From a story about slow wine written by a sommelier to a feature on the arduous process of growing heirloom grains written by Chris Wilkins of Root Baking Co., I was happily surprised by how well non-writers could write. Who knew one of our local bakers was such a wordsmith? Hopefully you'll find something unexpected here too, and maybe a greater appreciation for the time, work, and commitment it takes to carry on the mission of Slow Food. —Kinsey Gidick

Support local businesses that support local businesses
Support local businesses that support local businesses Symbiotic Supper

When a chef enters into the process of creating a menu, he or she has basically two options: a permanent menu or one that changes with the seasons. Executing a menu in a restaurant is all about decisions. And just like many things in life, the best choice is the hard one, the responsible choice. — Alex Lira


Le Farfalle links the pleasures of the table 
with people and place
Le Farfalle links the pleasures of the table with people and place Slowdown

Italian food is well-suited to the Lowcountry's tastes. While universally appealing, it boils down to ingredient-driven cuisine with a strong sense of place and that is something Charleston does decidedly well. — Carolyn Larson


The grain renaissance is a slow food labor of love
The grain renaissance is a slow food labor of love Kernels of Truth

The notion of "slow" grain is a funny thing. A kernel of rice, wheat, or rye is as much a brazen reminder of our agricultural origins as it is a metaphor for our collective accomplishments since the earliest communities formed around the domestication of cereal crops. — Chris Wilkins


Slow Wine rejects industrial protocol in exchange for biodiversity
Slow Wine rejects industrial protocol in exchange for biodiversity Veni Vidi Vino

It's not news that many people are now aware of the possible effects of pesticides, herbicides, growth hormones, and antibiotics in our food today. If you've ever read anything by Michael Pollan, author of The Omnivore's Dilemma, you know the reengineering that's taken place within our food systems. — Jason Parrish


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