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Dish Restaurant Guide

Winter 2018

Husk Restaurant

Much like the old Volkswagen Bug ads, "Think Small" can be applied to many things. But it certainly seems appropriate right now in Charleston. With the crushing cost of rent, lack of parking, and staffing woes, upending the traditional restaurant concept isn't just a fun idea, for many chefs, it means survival. We've found a host of stories for this issue of Dish that illustrate just that. From pop-ups to entirely different takes on what a restaurant is, this city's culinary scene is evolving and we're not just talking about a shift from fine dining. Local chefs are exploring the entire idea of what a restaurant is. Hope you enjoy. —Kinsey Gidick

A civic reevaluation is needed to keep the Gullah-Geechee legacy alive
A civic reevaluation is needed to keep the Gullah-Geechee legacy alive The Value of Guts

Last month I introduced a chef from Denmark (the country) to the briny nuances of pickled pig's feet. We found them in all their day-glo pink glory in a dusty jug that Junior Backman dipped into while preparing a morning feast of spicy steamed crabs at his eponymous fish shack on Sol Legare. — Jeff Allen


Four sisters recall Charleston's food scene, before and after segregation
Four sisters recall Charleston's food scene, before and after segregation Growing Up Geechee

It was during Sunday school at the church of my father's youth that I realized I was Geechee. We were in Tennessee visiting Dad's family when it happened. I have a younger brother, and this pair of sisters, Summer and Winter, assumed that we'd come all the way from Charleston to pair up like some type of romantic sitcom — they were all over us. — K.J. Kearney


Your guide to tracking down the best Gullah eats
Your guide to tracking down the best Gullah eats Off the Eatin' Path

When it comes to finding Gullah cuisine, the search can be perplexing. The entrepôt for the African slave trade, Charleston sits in the center of the Gullah Geechee Corridor — an area spanning from Wilmington, N.C. to Jacksonville, Fla. — Kinsey Gidick


Does traditional Gullah cuisine offer the way forward for Charleston fine dining?
Does traditional Gullah cuisine offer the way forward for Charleston fine dining? Plating the Past

We talk about Southern food as though it's a singularity," says Forrest Parker, the chef at the Old Village Post House in Mt. Pleasant. "But to me it seems plainly evident that it's extremely diverse." — Robert F. Moss


Charlotte Jenkins wrote the book on Gullah cuisine
Charlotte Jenkins wrote the book on Gullah cuisine Something Great from Something Little

I got started cooking at the age of nine as my mother left to take care of a sister who was ill. My mother said you all need to try to make it without me, so I told her I would cook. I did it, everything went well, and I enjoyed it. And ever since then I've been cooking. — Charlotte Jenkins


From conch to oxtail, BJ Dennis teaches us how to make a true home-cooked Gullah meal
From conch to oxtail, BJ Dennis teaches us how to make a true home-cooked Gullah meal Yes Chef

BJ Dennis is a man of his word. Back in 2012, the chef told us that his biggest challenge was turning diners on to Gullah-Geechee cuisine. He wanted to bring it back. "Kids don't understand the culture here at all," he told City Paper. "They're more worried about the hottest bar of the week." — Eric Doksa