A Charleston Guide to Protesting 

Activism in the Holy City

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Maria Fabrizio

Despite the city's much-lauded gentility, Charleston is no stranger to protests. In the early '60s, weeks of boycotts and marches against segregation resulted in the arrests of hundreds. In the fall of 1969, 200 protesters marched from Hampton Park, led by four men carrying a black coffin to protest the United States' continued involvement in Vietnam. Recently, we've seen Charleston host sister marches in solidarity with demonstrations all over the country. And not a single Pepsi was needed. For those looking to get active and mobilize, here's a helpful guide to protesting in Charleston.

So, you want to march in Charleston?
So, you want to march in Charleston? The Official Route

Let's say you want to hold a march of your own, but civil disobedience really isn't your thing. It may be something you've never considered before, but if you find it's time you and a few hundred like-minded individuals took a stand, here's a few things you'll need to do. — Dustin Waters


Brett Bursey has been organizing for more than four decades
Brett Bursey has been organizing for more than four decades Know your Rights

Brett Bursey has been the state's protest ambassador for decades. "It's been one of my crosses to bear to educate citizens and police," says Bursey. From protesting against Nixon's administration to George W.'s, Bursey has been part of hundreds of public demonstrations; perhaps most famously Bursey is responsible for bringing to the fore those Orwellian "free speech zones" we are now (mostly) familiar with. — Mary Scott Hardaway


An organizer of the Charleston Women's March describes her first foray into large-scale demonstrations
An organizer of the Charleston Women's March describes her first foray into large-scale demonstrations Learning from Experience

For Courtney O'Leary, organizing the Charleston Women's March was "trial by fire." A stay-at-home mom, O'Leary says she is actively involved in the community, but she had never organized a grassroots event of this magnitude before. — Mary Scott Hardaway


Advice on organizing from Black Lives Matter Charleston's Muhiyidin d'Baha
Advice on organizing from Black Lives Matter Charleston's Muhiyidin d'Baha The Flag Bearer

Before he leapt into everyone's Twitter feeds by snatching a Confederate flag from protesters, local Black Lives Matter organizer Muhiyidin d'Baha had long been one of the Charleston area's most vocal activists. — Dustin Waters


Charleston's next big march is one for science
Charleston's next big march is one for science Test Tubes and Protest Signs

Staging a march is more of an art than a science, but that's not stopping Charleston's scientific community from taking it to the streets. — Dustin Waters


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