The
Lit
Issue

Amid all the hubbub over No. 1 in the World-this and James Beard-that, we often forget that the Holy City is more than a top tourist spot and the culinary playground for some of America’s best chefs. The truth is, Charleston is the home — physically or spiritually — for some truly great writers. Although Pat Conroy is the writer most often identified with our beloved city, there’s Mary Alice Monroe, Dorothea Benton Frank, Bret Lott, Brad Taylor, the late Robert Jordan, and a host of others. For our 2014 Literary Issue, we’ve enlisted a handful of the Lowcountry’s best — from sci-fi phenom Hugh Howey to S.C. Poet Laureate Marjory Wentworth. Enjoy.

The Great Education of April Sue Spivey
The Great Education of April Sue Spivey

April and Sue Spivey held hands as they each tried to read the other one's mind. They could sometimes, or so it seemed. It wasn't so much reading minds as it was knowing the other sister deeply and anticipating a reaction. — Nicole Seitz


"The Running River' & "CODE." by Marcus Amaker
"The Running River' & "CODE." by Marcus Amaker

If I write lines of poems
like I write lines of code,
no comma would be out of place
and every quotation mark left open
would throw the whole piece off center. — Marcus Amaker


"A Father's Fist" by Hugh Howey
"A Father's Fist" by Hugh Howey

A small arm braves the wind at highway speeds and pumps the air, reaching and grabbing at invisible rungs that lead up to the heavens. There is an urge in that young mind, a desperate craving to be seen by this stranger in a truck. It's the fear of being missed, of being passed right by. — Hugh Howey


One book dealer and dad's take on some great children's lit
One book dealer and dad's take on some great children's lit The Demon-Spawn Horde

If you've ever been to an Ikea, you might have seen a display in kitchens with a robot arm opening and closing a cabinet door thousands of times. Parents who've read Olivia eight million times can relate. — Jonathan Sanchez


"In Shallow Graves" by Ken Burger
"In Shallow Graves" by Ken Burger

My words lie in shallow graves where people put things they can't throw away. As I walk through my charmed life, I'm often approached by people, kind people, beautiful people, my people, who say meeting me after years of reading my columns in the local newspaper is a good thing. — Ken Burger


Staying on top of current events with South Carolina Poet Laureate Marjory Wentworth
Staying on top of current events with South Carolina Poet Laureate Marjory Wentworth Tremors and Treading

It's the smirk on her face that gets me. One side of her mouth turned
up the way a child would look after being caught in a lie.
She must have been hungover to begin with. Christmas morning
at the police station; bail set at $10,000, her shirt still covered — Marjory Wentworth


"Aurora Borealis" by Bristol Palin
"Aurora Borealis" by Bristol Palin As Told Through John Warner

It's lonely in Alaska. That's why families are big, so there's always someone else around, but most of your family isn't around, and maybe that's why you fall into the arms of the handsomest hockey player in town, let him take your clothes off, let him place his hands on your hips and look at you and bring his lips to your belly and call you beautiful, which is something you've been taught to value. — Bristol Palin (as told through John Warner)


A conversation (imagined) between Bob Dylan and Wendell Berry
A conversation (imagined) between Bob Dylan and Wendell Berry Blowing It

It's fall 2016 and the new and elegantly massive Gaillard Center is finally opening, a year and a half after it was supposed to. There's a black-tie gala, a symphony performance, and a selection of arias from Gian Carlo Menotti's operas. — Stephanie Hunt


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