Food Trucks 

Autobanh Food Truck

Downtown - Food Trucks

Courtesy John Royall

Yeah, bánh mì sandwiches are a trend. And one we hope is around forever because there is almost nothing better than trying to wrap your mouth around a baguette stuffed with fresh cilantro, pickled and fresh veggies, cucumber, spicy mayo, and meat. AutoBanh is a strong contender in this sudden sandwich scene, serving five different versions out of their beautifully painted purple truck. They offer two to three different kinds of pork, a lemongrass grilled chicken, a sweet and spicy Mexican style al pastor, the vegetarian-friendly curry fried tofu, and our favorite, the Southern tinged crispy chicken, which comes with pickled okra and a honey sriracha glaze. You can find this truck every Wednesday at the True Value on East Bay Street 11 a.m.-3 p.m. —Susan Cohen Dish (Winter 2013)

Cory's Grilled Cheese

Downtown - Food Trucks

We have a soft spot for Cory, the bespectacled griller of cheese who frequently sets up on the College of Charleston campus in a tiny silver box. Cory offers 10 different cheeses for five different breads (including a gluten-free one), with toppings like avocado, fried onions, sautéed peppers, and plenty more, and there are some sweet choices for a more indulgent dessert sandwich. The plethora of toppings can be intimidating, but you wouldn’t go wrong ordering one of his “famous” cheeses. With muenster and bacon, it’s sweet and salty and gooey and we want one right now. —Susan Cohen Dish (Winter 2013)

Diggity Donuts

Downtown - Food Trucks

Ambergre Sloan’s doughnuts are warm, spongy, and fresh from the fryer. You’d never guess they are also whole grain and vegan. The lemon blueberry is covered in a slightly tart, shockingly pink frosting, but you should really try the buzzed-about peanut butter sriracha. The kick of the hot sauce is offset by the especially sweet peanut butter — it’s sugar and spice and everything nice. Sloan also has sandwiches, brunch food (when she’s doing her Little Blue Brunch Truck), a wedding cake alternative, and gluten-free stuff, too. —Susan Cohen Dish (Winter 2013)

Dulce Truck

Downtown - Food Trucks

Restaurant quality desserts and sweet teas made using leaves from Charleston Tea Plantation.

The Foodie Truck

Downtown - Food Trucks

It seems like Charleston’s food truck scene may be tapering off just a bit, but we’re glad the Foodie Truck made it on the road before the trend started to plateau. Jonathan Corey and John Amato, food-and-bev vets with experience in the kitchens of Charleston’s best restaurants, are tackling the food truck scene with a hyper-local concept, serving up soups, sandwiches, burgers, and biscuits made from locally sourced products. There’s a little taste of everything here, from Italian pork loin hoagies to Korean barbecue steam buns and fried local fish. Occasionally desserts and sides (like french fries and mac and cheese) make it onto the menu too, but if they have a slushy on the menu, get it. On Friday nights, stop by Seanachai on Johns Island and grab a bite. —Susan Cohen Dish (Winter 2013)

Magic Cheese Truck

Downtown - Food Trucks

There’s an inevitable sense of guilt that comes with ordering a grilled cheese from a public establishment. All deliciousness aside, it can be hard to justify spending $6-$8 on a sandwich when you can go to a grocery store, buy the same components, and make yourself a dozen copies of the very same sandwich. So it’s got to be a pretty mean grilled cheese to justify the cash. That being said, the Magic Cheese Truck makes a pretty mean, and absurdly cheesy, grilled cheese. Go traditional with cheddar, upgrade to a three-cheese combo, add bacon, or go for whatever sandwich special they’re offering any given week. The dipper cup of thick tomato soup they put on the side (along with a lollipop) gets raves. —Susan Cohen Dish (Winter 2013)

Outta My Huevos

North Charleston - Food Trucks

Food trucks tend to stick to themes, something that’s obvious in Charleston’s mobile kitchen scene: You can choose from barbecue, tacos, or Italian, for example. Pot Kettle Black’s theme is immigrant-style food that’s meant to inspire nostalgia, which manages to represent a variety of different cuisines. Calling themselves a “wayward bistro,” PKB serves dipped Italian beefs, muffulettas, pimento grilled cheeses, and other multicultural options, as well as soups. The Duck Hunt — duck confit, arugula, and brie on a baguette — kicks the quality up a notch, but prepare to hand over $10 for a fairly small sandwich. —Susan Cohen, DISH (Winter 2013)

Pot Kettle Black

Downtown - Food Trucks

Food trucks tend to stick to themes, something that’s obvious in Charleston’s mobile kitchen scene: You can choose from barbecue, tacos, or Italian, for example. Pot Kettle Black’s theme is immigrant-style food that’s meant to inspire nostalgia, which manages to represent a variety of different cuisines. Calling themselves a “wayward bistro,” PKB serves dipped Italian beefs, muffulettas, pimento grilled cheeses, and other multicultural options, as well as soups. The Duck Hunt — duck confit, arugula, and brie on a baguette — kicks the quality up a notch, but prepare to hand over $10 for a fairly small sandwich. —Susan Cohen Dish (Winter 2013)

Roti Rolls

North Charleston - Food Trucks

File photo

Roti rollin'

Roti Rolls has been slinging South Asian flatbreads filled with distinctly Southern ingredients that are local and seasonal since the earliest days of the local food truck trend. They’ve become pros at layering flavors, textures, and cuisines, exemplified by the Thurman Murman. This roll is packed with a slightly spicy mac and cheese, crunchy pickled veggies that are cool and tart, and a rich and savory short rib. The roti itself is equally soft and crunchy. Other components include curried peaches, local sausage, kimchi, and pork belly. They make eggy breakfast rotis too, and they’ve been known to serve the occasional burger or hot dog (with their own, local-centric twists). We haven’t seen it on the menu recently, but their Buddha Bowl (a soupy mix of rice, noodles, broth, veggies, kimchi, and more) was a big hit this winter. The talents behind Roti have settled down recently with a permanent location called the Green Door, but you can still find Roti Rolls roaming the streets from time to time. —Susan Cohen Dish (Winter 2013)

Tokyo Crepes

Folly Beach - Food Trucks

Tokyo Crepes frequently ventures out from their base on Folly Beach and trades spots with other members of the Charleston Food Truck Federation. Some of these newer vehicles should take some cues from Tokyo Crepes, who give their customers hearty portions at reasonable prices. Ten bucks can usually get you both a savory and a sweet crepe. There are touches of Asian influences on the menu, like in the fresh teriyaki chicken, the daily bento box specials, and the extensive tea list. Upgrade from the typical fruit-and-chocolate crepe to the Dream, which adds the truck’s creamy homemade custard to the mix. —Susan Cohen Dish (Winter 2013)
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