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Comment Archives: Stories: News+Opinion: Features

Re: “What can Charleston learn from what East of the Cooper has lost?

It's because you didn't grow up here. I've watched this awesome little town become a huge disaster. It was fun and there was a ton of exciting things to do when I was younger. Now you can't go 5 minutes down the road with out getting stuck in some traffic. For folks that haven't been here for more than 20 years have no clue on what Mt pleasant used to be like. This is where I grew up and my roots are deep. But I go around every day finding it less desirable to want to stay. This is my home town and it always will. But I want my home town back!

85 of 95 people like this.
Posted by Andrew Long on May 3, 2017 at 11:44 AM

Re: “What can Charleston learn from what East of the Cooper has lost?

Granted, I've only commuted to Mt. P, and only from in the mid-2000s, but I found mt pleasant to have no charm. Dive bars exist everywhere; that doesn't a town make. I found it to be exactly what was described by the author at vintage coffee - upper middle class white families with 2.5 kids who spend 3 hours a day in their cars and huge, sprawling neighborhoods with no connectivity and no way to walk or bike anywhere outside those neighborhoods. Commuter traffic (raises hand) is an absolute nightmare. Shem creek is a nice vista but you can't get inexpensive seafood or anything - just overpriced cocktails at new places like tavern and table. I'm sorry but I never got it.

45 of 70 people like this.
Posted by jennysays on May 3, 2017 at 9:19 AM

Re: “With federal investigations ongoing, Charleston is not immune to anti-Semitic threats

Hi Lynnar,

I'm British and on vacation in Charleston. I stumbled across your comments whilst looking at restaurant articles.

You seem to have read a lot of false information - 'Mohammed" isn't the most popular baby name in the UK. (Not that there would be anything inherently wrong with that. The UK is a largely secular country - although historically/culturally Christian, belief in God/churchgoing is relatively scarce. The country is tolerant of religion, though, which applies as much to Muslims as it does to Christians, Hindus, Sikhs, Jewish people etc.)

https://www.theguardian.com/news/datablog/2014/dec/01/muhammad-not-most-popular-boys-name-in-britain

On the subject of anti-Semitism, my wife and son are Jewish, and have never encountered any in the UK. That's not to say it doesn't exist, and of course it is deplorable in any form, but you are greatly exaggerating the situation. There were 1024 incidents in the most recent year, which is an unacceptable number, but it must remembered that these incidents include social media posts, graffiti etc. It's *because* anti-Semitism is taken so seriously in the UK (and other northern-European countries) that these figures exist and even the smallest of incidents is (rightly) included. Some right-wing outlets will try to conflate pro-Palestinian sentiment with anti-Semitism, which may skew your impression. Of course, there are many Jewish people in Israel who favour a two-state solution. Anyway, my point here is you have been given an entirely wrong impression by suggesting that northern Europe is descending into a Neo-Nazi dystopia.

On Sweden, the misrepresentation of the country has been covered extensively elsewhere. The way you describe Malm is inaccurate. I lived in Sweden for a long time, and Swedes are (by and large) proud to be an open country which welcomes those in need. That's not to say it's a country without problems, but show me one that is, at any point in history. This is a good debunking of the immigration/rape correlation myth. http://www.twitlonger.com/show/n_1soqk97

I love America. My wife and her family are American. But this 'greatest country' in the world mentality sounds a lot like jingoism. By what metric? Economically? What about other equally (or more) important factors? Happiness? Quality of life? Health of population? Gap between rich and poor? Violence? Education?

Love the place you live, try to fix the things you don't like, but there is no such thing as 'the greatest country on earth'. America falls a long way down the list on many of the things mentioned above, and is wonderful in so many other ways.

I wrote this reply because you stated a lot of things about the part of the world I call home as fact, when they're not. Posting stuff like this on the internet makes the world seem like a worse and more scary place than it is.

I've enjoyed visiting your beautiful city.

Posted by Jamie Broadbent on April 30, 2017 at 3:10 PM

Re: “City and state legislators push plans to bolster affordable housing in Charleston

The Homeownership Initiative has several homes in its inventory and is a great place to start to provide affordable housing. This legislation kicks the can down the road. We have a good start in the HI program it's just highly under utilized. Please Google it to learn more

Posted by John McCollum on April 27, 2017 at 4:29 PM

Re: “Blondie the horse's accident raises moral questions about the carriage tour industry

I'm just here for the comments

1 of 1 people like this.
Posted by Kevin Brunson on April 21, 2017 at 1:16 PM

Re: “New interactive map shows effects of sea level rise on Charleston

Time to live on a boat!
Kevin Brunson

Posted by Kevin Brunson on April 21, 2017 at 1:16 PM

Re: “New interactive map shows effects of sea level rise on Charleston

Mat Cat, if God's Mighty Hand will deliver us from rising sea levels, why doesn't he go a little further with his Mighty Hand and deliver us from famine, pestilence, war and starvation? What hogwash.

0 of 1 people like this.
Posted by levester on April 20, 2017 at 9:56 PM

Re: “Blondie the horse's accident raises moral questions about the carriage tour industry

Gail Kof. Are you aware the average draft horse weighs between 1500 and 2000 pounds. You don't hear any horses cry because they don't cry! You dern sure don't hear carriage horses cry. Never happens nor has it happened. You seem to be very uninformed about horses. You certainly are the definition of ultracrepidarian!

Posted by Sherrie Zabinski on April 20, 2017 at 8:01 PM

Re: “Blondie the horse's accident raises moral questions about the carriage tour industry

There should be a scale to weigh the passengers that are signed up for one carriage before loading it up. Some of these people are heavier than the horses. Each carriage should have a total weight limit for every group going on board before it is allowed out. The maximum temperature that the horses are allowed out should be lowered to 80. These horses are miserable I hear them crying during the tours. Seeing them makes Charleston less desirable as a place to live.

0 of 1 people like this.
Posted by Gail Kof on April 20, 2017 at 8:10 AM

Re: “Can Burke High School unite Charleston?

I, too, am a graduate of the class of 1968. I recall many teachers with advanced degrees, and a fierce desire to help us succeed. Though we received substandard resources, these teacher challenged us and made sure that we received a first class education, academically and socially.

1 of 1 people like this.
Posted by Rita Hector on April 18, 2017 at 11:51 PM

Re: “Can Burke High School unite Charleston?

This is a fascinating, if not tragic, account of the decline of Burke High School! As a proud Burke alum, Class of 68, a former member of the famed band, and also coached by Modie Risher, this account is truly heartbreaking to say the least! Having grown up in the shadows of BHS, although I no longer reside in Charleston, I frequently return to my old neighborhood where I have witnessed firsthand the changes so eloquently detailed in this article. I am shocked to learn that the enrollment at BHS is now less than 400 students! There were 241 students in my graduating class. Suffice it to say, Charleston has certainly changed since I left in 1968 and we can debate whether the many changes have been for the better...but that's a conversation for another day!

3 of 3 people like this.
Posted by Gerald Hamilton on April 18, 2017 at 11:18 AM

Re: “So, you want to march in Charleston?

If you REALLY want to affect change, VOTE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

2 of 2 people like this.
Posted by working mom on April 16, 2017 at 8:36 PM

Re: “Brett Bursey has been organizing for more than four decades

I have known Mr. Bursey since the time of his famous protest against President Bush Jr. in a so-called protest free-zone. I even appealed to President Obama to pardon Mr. Bursey. If anyone knows the meaning of protest and civil disobedience it's my friend Brett Bursey!

2 of 5 people like this.
Posted by Sterling Rothchild on April 14, 2017 at 3:38 AM

Re: “So, you want to march in Charleston?

If you want to affect real, positive change that benefits everyone, it can't be done by simply ramping up emotion with a public display of discontent. There is too much work left to do when the hub-bub dies down. Forget radical rhetoric and oppositional behavior. Why create bitter, eternal enemies to oppose your cause? Why chance innocent blood on your hands if things get out of hand? If you are willing to die for your cause, then surely you should be willing to work for it. I suppose dying is easier.

if your cause is righteous, then offering your case in a spirit of fellowship should be able to win the day.

Listen, youngsters. I dont need to quote another scholar, I have been hip since hip was hep. Here is how you change the world . . . with positive energy, an open heart, and patience. It's all good and getting better all the time, why deny it? Protest? In ten years all but two of the moment have gone mainstream or sold out to corporate. Those two are still sleeping in the park and eating at the Daily Bread Mission.

4 of 7 people like this.
Posted by Chip Curry on April 13, 2017 at 10:54 PM

Re: “Advice on organizing from Black Lives Matter Charleston's Muhiyidin d'Baha

With so many words you don't have any mention of anything he did that helped make anyone's life better. Organizing is more than self promotion. Is this "organizing" nothing more than a fundraising scam?

The confederate battle flag has been adopted by hate groups as their symbol. Terrorist criminal organizations like the klan and nazis wave this flag. Why steal their flag?


By the way, are criminal charges pending against Muhiyidin d'Baha for his flag grab?

4 of 7 people like this.
Posted by Tom Tito on April 13, 2017 at 5:20 PM

Re: “Advice on organizing from Black Lives Matter Charleston's Muhiyidin d'Baha

All Lives Matter,

Unless you Multiply them by the Speed of Light Squared,

Then they Energy !

6 of 11 people like this.
Posted by Paul Luman on April 12, 2017 at 3:17 PM

Re: “Advice on organizing from Black Lives Matter Charleston's Muhiyidin d'Baha

An excellent article about a brilliant young activist. Charleston is privileged (no pun intended) to have Muhiyidin d'Baha working to make our community a more just place for all of us.

8 of 19 people like this.
Posted by MelvintheBarbarian on April 12, 2017 at 1:41 PM

Re: “An organizer of the Charleston Women's March describes her first foray into large-scale demonstrations

It was a well run and well attended event. The weather was iffy but 3,000 or so attended. Having people march from various locals throughout the city was a stroke of genius. Court and crew are to be commended for their efforts.

12 of 16 people like this.
Posted by Lee Anne on April 12, 2017 at 11:19 AM

Re: “What one near-fatal overdose can teach South Carolina about the need for new drug laws

Usual government over reach wasting money and time on task forces that do nothing but spend more money. MAKE THE BIG PHARMAS PAY FOR OD'S, TREATMENTS, AND OR DEATHS... the drive, motivation and release of all these senseless drugs on the street will go away real quick. All the motivation is to sell more, as there is no consequence to them, and only to the families that lose their children or spouses.

4 of 6 people like this.
Posted by Kenneth Emery on March 31, 2017 at 1:23 PM

Re: “What one near-fatal overdose can teach South Carolina about the need for new drug laws

50,000 Americans died from overdose in 2015, 2/3 were from prescription drugs used incorrectly / illegally.

2 of 3 people like this.
Posted by Jshicke on March 31, 2017 at 12:53 PM
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