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Comment Archives: Stories: News+Opinion: Will Moredock

Re: “In South Carolina, we perfected the politics of fear long ago

"...we are now focused on the Islamic State, the latest apparition to keep conservatives like Lindsay Graham and Joe Wilson on the brink of hysteria."

Disgraceful.
Mr Moredock, you should be ashamed of yourself for writing this article.

Isis is a real threat to free people everywhere, not some figment of Mr Graham's imagination.
How we respond to their threat is up for debate.

But their violence and treatment of free peoples everywhere, is all too real.

The rise of Islamic State (Isis) has displaced over 3.3 million people in Iraq alone, with millions more fleeing Syria for Lebanon, Turkey and the Gulf, and many of them risking perilous journeys to Europe via Egypt, Libya and the Mediterranean.
In 2015, asylum applications to rich countries reached their highest level for over two decades in 2014, with 866,000 applications lodged, an increase of 45% on 2013 and two-thirds of those in the European Union.
As well as Iraq, more than 3.8 million Syrians have fled to the neighbouring states of Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan and Egypt and another 7.6 million are displaced inside the country, according to the UN. These include tens of thousands of Palestinian refugees living in the Yarmouk camp near Damascus, which recently became the front line in Syria's civil war.
Much of the stories of the horrors that refugees have witnessed under IS rule have come from Iraq, where the Yazidi minority suffered harrowing conditions as the terrorist group advanced. Speaking earlier in 2015, UNHCR special envoy Angelina Jolie spoke of the accounts she had heard from those who had escaped or been liberated from IS's grasp.
"Nothing can prepare you for the horrific stories of these survivors of kidnap, abuse and exploitation and to see how they cannot all get the urgent help they need and deserve," Jolie said. "The needs so dramatically outstrip the resources available in this vast crisis." "Much more international assistance is needed."

We can debate how much of a response and assistance our nation should provide.
But the threat of ISIS is mostly definitely NOT a crazy right wing conspiracy that should be compared in your article to the fear mongering of some racist SC leader from the 18th century.

disgusting.

2 of 7 people like this.
Posted by artrogue on June 17, 2015 at 7:26 PM

Re: “In South Carolina, we perfected the politics of fear long ago

It's hard to take Miss Lindsay seriously. At the sign of a mouse our Senator grabs the pearls, puts on her finest military frock, screeches hysterically to play with seamen and then throws herself on the fainting couch. How can the war party be taken seriously with a candidate like Lindsay Graham as its figurehead.

5 of 6 people like this.
Posted by LuvtheNewslessCourier on June 17, 2015 at 3:11 PM

Re: “In South Carolina, we perfected the politics of fear long ago

Do people actually listen to old Linds?

5 of 7 people like this.
Posted by CIACulinaryKid on June 17, 2015 at 12:43 PM

Re: “In South Carolina, we perfected the politics of fear long ago

"Sen. Lindsay Graham made it clear what kind of campaign he would run. "I want to be president to defeat the enemies trying to kill us," he announced."

Curious that he would want to defeat the Republican Party. That can't be a sound campaign strategy.

8 of 12 people like this.
Posted by Ron Liberte on June 17, 2015 at 9:49 AM

Re: “Mary C. Simms Oliphant's troubling history of South Carolina

She was not simply a product of her times, she was a supporter of the institution! She had choices just like the Blackburn sisters did, to support the institution of slavery or to be an abolitionist, or at the very least show respect for human life! She chose to support and promote slavery in an extreme and profound way. Causing untold damage for the relationship between the races and for the negative perception of a race of people undeserving of such!

9 of 9 people like this.
Posted by Joyceann Gray on May 13, 2015 at 10:24 AM

Re: “Return of the Friendship 9

I remember your parents; your dad better than your mom. The times I visited you in your home were surreal. I was the son of a mill worked visiting in the home of the plant manager. I had family members who told me that I didn't respect my place. My daddy loved it; but, he was unusual for a forth-grad educated mill hand.
Your mother was the definition of a refined Southern lady. She was hospitable to me and very kind, although I'm sure that she knew I didn't belong there.
I'm glad you didn't respect the social rules of mill-town Kershaw. I'd have missed a special chapter. I'd have missed a special friendship.
Here's to rebels who broke some rigid rules!

Posted by Sam Catoe on February 2, 2015 at 10:48 AM

Re: “Return of the Friendship 9

Couldn't have said it better myself!

2 of 4 people like this.
Posted by Will Moredock on February 2, 2015 at 1:30 AM

Re: “My beef with P&C columnist R.L. Schreadley

I enjoy reading Shreadley. You, on the other hand, are passing on something more akin to "Talking Points". Benghazi taught me that Democrats in leadership can say anything as long as they stick together...loyal to the Talking Points. And you, most certainly, are no different. Thank you, Mr. Schreadley. Will Moredock is more suitable to AP or MSNBC.

1 of 1 people like this.
Posted by Jim Self on January 24, 2015 at 8:08 AM

Re: “Return of the Friendship 9

“I believe all Southern liberals come from the same starting point--race. Once you figure out they are lying to you about race, you start to question everything.”

― Molly Ivins

7 of 9 people like this.
Posted by Laura Penny on January 21, 2015 at 2:15 PM

Re: “One Post & Courier columnist could use a First Amendment primer

The Establishment Clause only addresses what the Congress may or may not do

Posted by Sharklops on January 5, 2015 at 12:48 PM

Re: “One Post & Courier columnist could use a First Amendment primer

arty wants us to "quit making law in the Legislative branch": with Republicans in charge of Congress, he is likely to get his wish!

1 of 3 people like this.
Posted by Robert Eckert on January 3, 2015 at 5:49 PM

Re: “One Post & Courier columnist could use a First Amendment primer

I don't know if Factory Connection was trying to be a wise guy or a dumb ass, but the site for the very secular Lowcountry Food Bank is http://lowcountryfoodbank.org/hope

4 of 7 people like this.
Posted by Will Moredock on January 2, 2015 at 11:24 PM

Re: “One Post & Courier columnist could use a First Amendment primer

Maybe we can get corporate marketing out of schools too? I always find it strange that we strictly prohibit religious proselytizers in our public schools but the Chic-fil-a Cow is always welcome to spread his message.

11 of 11 people like this.
Posted by Native Ink on January 2, 2015 at 7:51 AM

Re: “One Post & Courier columnist could use a First Amendment primer

Given the US supreme court's ruling on prayers at city council meetings, it would not surprise me if our Opus Dei court overturns the ban on school prayer before Scalia shuffles off his mortal coil.
This court doesn't care about precedent. It doesn't appear to occur to them that a future court will have at least as much contempt for their newbie precedents than they have shown for those which are a century old.

6 of 7 people like this.
Posted by nitrat on January 1, 2015 at 9:59 PM

Re: “One Post & Courier columnist could use a First Amendment primer

Arty, Article III is a pretty significant part of the Constitution. Sorry, you don't get to set SCOTUS precedents aside.

4 of 5 people like this.
Posted by Keith Babberney on January 1, 2015 at 1:36 PM

Re: “One Post & Courier columnist could use a First Amendment primer

Lewis and Mat, I'm embarrassed. Of course laws are made in the Legislative branch and I erroneously used Legislative instead of Judicial branch in my statement above. I, too, used to think "intent" was important in interpreting the often ambiguous wording of the Constitution. However, given the often lack of impartiality in SCOTUS rulings, I think we suffer enough with the wording and the consideration of intent (which, btw, is outside of the Constitution) further distorts the law of the land.

2 of 5 people like this.
Posted by arty on January 1, 2015 at 12:48 PM

Re: “One Post & Courier columnist could use a First Amendment primer

McCollum v. Bd. of Educ., 333 U.S. 203, 231 (1948). In “no activity of the State is it more vital to keep out divisive forces than in its schools, to avoid confusing, not to say fusing, what the Constitution sought to keep strictly apart.”

9 of 9 people like this.
Posted by Bonnie Cleaveland on December 31, 2014 at 11:34 PM

Re: “One Post & Courier columnist could use a First Amendment primer

Arty wrote " there is no "separation of church and state" in the Constitution." You are either being disingenuous or are truly ignorant.

Yes, those words are not in the constitution. Thomas Jefferson first used those words when describing the intent of the first amendment to a group of baptists concerned about their religious freedom since they were a minority denomination. In addition, the main author of the Constitution, James Madison, wrote several documents asserting that the separation of church and state were conceptually what the establishment clause established.

Just because those words aren't there doesn't mean that isn't it's intent. Also, the legislative branch didn't make laws that require public schools to not include religious content, the judicial branch made a decision that did. The decision regarding school prayer was made by the Supreme Court, and has been upheld several times. The Constitution clearly establishes that the Supreme Court is intended to be the final arbiters of the meaning of the constitution. Therefore, your statement that "[i]t's about time we get back to Constitutional basics and quit making law in the Legislative branch" is just wrong. Nothing about this has to do with the legislative branch changing the constitution. The legislative branch's job IS to make laws, but those laws must be consistent with the constitution, and the SCOTUS determines whether they are or not.

15 of 18 people like this.
Posted by Lewis Chasalow on December 31, 2014 at 10:37 PM

Re: “One Post & Courier columnist could use a First Amendment primer

Thank you Mickie, that was 3 Jesus Christs in 3 sentences. Thats 3 too many Jesus's for me. I am sure they would feed anyone who was hungry regardless of religion but at the end of the day they are still pushing a Baptist agenda.

Factoryconnection, why thats brilliant! They should start a organization called the Lowcountry food bank here in the Chuck. One with no religious association, agenda or mission except feeding over 200,000 families, children and seniors in need each year across coastal SC. See y'all February 22 at the 16th annual Chefs Feast.

18 of 21 people like this.
Posted by CIACulinaryKid on December 31, 2014 at 6:05 PM

Re: “One Post & Courier columnist could use a First Amendment primer

Sorry, factoryconnection, I'm freelance. I'm allowed to take the easy ones just like anyone else.

8 of 13 people like this.
Posted by mat catastrophe on December 31, 2014 at 3:17 PM
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