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Comment Archives: Stories: News+Opinion: History Attic

Re: “The historical reason why Charleston's streets flood

My Dad gave me this postcard framed and has told me stories of Charleston over the years. Apparently Hurricane Hugo made Charleston much better after the Federal money poured into rebuild everything. He grew up here and our ancestors immigrated here from France many many years ago.

7 of 9 people like this.
Posted by lauracarter on October 3, 2015 at 8:53 PM

Re: “The historical reason why Charleston's streets flood

Wow what great ingenuity. that is awesome. The city has done very well at filling in areas to make them livable and to be able to put buildings on them. We just got to figure out how to get bigger pumps to get all that water out of there. Cheers cheers to the individuals and the ingenuity and the engineers that made it all happen. #Charlestonstrong

3 of 10 people like this.
Posted by Gavin Morris on October 3, 2015 at 6:29 PM

Re: “The historical reason why Charleston's streets flood

So, in parts, Charleston was built on shit and trash.

17 of 29 people like this.
Posted by John Jackson 1 on October 3, 2015 at 10:33 AM

Re: “The historical reason why Charleston's streets flood

I just want to know the date of this postcard...?

5 of 6 people like this.
Posted by Madelyn Pickin Lawrence on October 3, 2015 at 12:42 AM

Re: “What is so magical about the Abandoned Building Revitalization Act?

This is so great to read. Abandoned structures are not only an eye-sore, but a hindrance to economic growth and community vitality. The whole neighborhood benefits when new life is given to these places, and I'm glad to see the state recognizes the importance in getting this done sooner rather than later.

5 of 6 people like this.
Posted by Golden Ratio on February 3, 2014 at 6:38 PM

Re: “How we can improve the Board of Architectural Review process

Apply BAR-like review/approval process to rural areas. 32 acres of woods and pastures is far more "historical" and in keeping with the character of Johns Island than 100 ticky tacky boxes no matter their design.

1 of 1 people like this.
Posted by Guy on December 11, 2013 at 4:02 PM

Re: “How we can improve the Board of Architectural Review process

Question: does the Preservation Society board approve the material that Evan Thompson provides to the City Paper as free content? Do his opinions reflect positions taken by the membership?

3 of 5 people like this.
Posted by ImFromHere on November 24, 2013 at 10:17 PM

Re: “How we can improve the Board of Architectural Review process

Blah blah blah. The Board of Architectural Review website shows all submitted documents for every agenda item. The Preservation Society website hasn't been updated since 2011. It's pitiful to rely on Facebook and City Paper for a public presence, while publishing the "quarterly" Preservation Progress twice a year. You need to establish institutional credibility before you propose a revamped website (expensive, donor-supported) as a solution to anything.
The Preservation Society claims Charleston Cottages as a priority. What's become of the NR nomination you were preparing? Houses on Lee Street are selling right now, and they will be renovated without review because there are no federal tax incentives for complying with preservation guidelines.
Finally, kiss my ass. "Similarly, to the extent possible, BAR members should avoid taking on controversial projects as part of their professional work they know will come before the board."

4 of 5 people like this.
Posted by ImFromHere on November 24, 2013 at 9:26 PM

Re: “How we can improve the Board of Architectural Review process

I do not think that the Clemson building was unattractive but it definitely did not fit in with the character of the buildings surrounding it. That was a good call by the BAR. However, I am not familiar with the proceedings so I cannot speak to whether or not they handled it with any tact or professionalism.

2 of 5 people like this.
Posted by nofaith on November 22, 2013 at 9:49 AM

Re: “How we can improve the Board of Architectural Review process

However, get rid of eternal ego

1 of 2 people like this.
Posted by Dawn Westbury on November 22, 2013 at 1:09 AM

Re: “How we can improve the Board of Architectural Review process

Given how insulting and provincial our august BAR acted toward Portland, Ore based Cloepfil regarding the Clemson building....they need to get off their Mount Olympus complex or resign and be replaced.

4 of 9 people like this.
Posted by Driftaway on November 20, 2013 at 10:36 PM

Re: “How we can improve the Board of Architectural Review process

Or we could get rid of it.

4 of 9 people like this.
Posted by mat catastrophe on November 20, 2013 at 6:57 PM

Re: “How we can improve the Board of Architectural Review process

To me the BAR is like going to the dentist for a root canal. You know it is going to be a pain, it is going to hurt for awhile, it is going to make you talk silly and it is just unpleasant. But, after it is all over with and you walk around and don't have that pain anymore it was all worth it. As a property owner it sucks to not be able to do everything you want to do to your own building but as someone who believes in preservation of the past I see the value in it. I wish, however, that if they are going to put these restrictions on homeowners that they would offer some low cost consulting so as not to burden them too much. Most folks have no problem following the rules but if it costs them an extra grand to hire someone that makes it a problem.

2 of 2 people like this.
Posted by nofaith on November 20, 2013 at 4:23 PM

Re: “How we can improve the Board of Architectural Review process

Expanded documentation is always a worthwhile objective in increasing our knowledge of the city, and bringing the resources that are available to historic districts on the National Register to a larger portion of the city is long overdue.
The B.A.R. process is surprisingly open, anyone can walk in and give their input on projects no matter how minor or off topic. Often, it is these conversations the distract from more important issues. We should be thankful, as most places don't allow nearly this type of transparency.
We as citizens should be more concerned with quality construction and poor planing/zoning than a particular style. A majority of the characteristics that make Charleston so enjoyable are actually contrary to current zoning regulations, and many historic buildings were a 'new' style at the time they were built.

3 of 6 people like this.
Posted by CCB on November 20, 2013 at 3:58 PM

Re: “A Second Sunday guide to King Street architecture

I liked these comment areas better before they had commercials.

3 of 6 people like this.
Posted by Ima Oldman on November 1, 2013 at 8:17 PM

Re: “A Second Sunday guide to King Street architecture

Come take a tour with almost any carriage company and we'll tell you a lot more interesting stories about more interesting buildings on that stretch of King Street. Take my night time walking tour and you're hear the REAL interesting stories of those same buildings.

2 of 2 people like this.
Posted by wickedmark on November 1, 2013 at 4:55 PM

Re: “A Second Sunday guide to King Street architecture

Well, Charlie, I'm so proud you have Buildings of Charleston in your collection and you passed the Tour Guide licensing exam(for those of you who don't know it's a real Bitch and Charleston should be proud to have such standards), but contrary to what Mommy taught you, Charlie, the world doesn't revolve around YOU. Evans articles are to educate and enlightened those "common folk" that you disdain and for my mind he does a damned good job of it.

2 of 6 people like this.
Posted by Ima Oldman on November 1, 2013 at 9:22 AM

Re: “A Second Sunday guide to King Street architecture

It's nice that Evan Thompson is retailing information that could easily be gathered from Buildings of Charleston, the Tour Guide Manual, or even the public library's website. It would be better if he would report on the Preservation Society's doings. They had a day-long "Holy City Initiative." How did that go? What progress on Seven to Save? Will there be a Preservation Progress in my lifetime?

7 of 11 people like this.
Posted by Charles Townsend on October 31, 2013 at 9:12 PM

Re: “A Second Sunday guide to King Street architecture

Thank you for this article. I love learning the history of these old buildings.

7 of 8 people like this.
Posted by Styrene_poly on October 30, 2013 at 10:21 AM

Re: “Twenty-five tongue-in-cheek guidelines for new buildings in Charleston

I hate going downtown now. So sad that all of this "crap" has appeared. The last straw for me was many years ago just after the Harbor Club and the Vendue Inn rooftop bar had just spent a small fortune remodeling their top floors when all of a sudden these monstrosities appeared out of nowhere and blocked the new beautiful views that had been created of the harbor and of Waterfront Park. Now those views are GONE. Don't even know that the park is even there anymore cause I can't SEE it anymore.

6 of 6 people like this.
Posted by Rog on October 18, 2013 at 3:47 AM
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