2016 Fall Arts Guide 

A look ahead

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Erin Bennett Banks

Dear Charleston, wake up. You’re sleeping on our city’s next big thing. Forget your food fascination for just one second and turn your attention to the stage. The Holy City is brimming with theatrical talent right now. We have young playwrights producing original work, theater companies bringing in New York productions, thespians pushing this city’s buttoned-up limits with controversial topics. But what are we doing with our entertainment dollars? Eating. Eating and eating and then eating again. Put down the fork and go see a show, dammit. If not for the love of the stage, do it to test the truth of Stella Adler who said, “Theater means the seeing place. It is the place people come to see the truth about life and the social situation.” Trust me, you’ll have way more to talk about at cocktail hour after watching PURE’s The Christians or Threshold Rep’s Becky Shaw. Don’t believe me? Read CP Theater Critic Maura Hogan’s piece on the state of Charleston’s theater scene. —Kinsey Gidick
A look at Charleston's theater scene today
A look at Charleston's theater scene today All the City's a Stage

From where I'm sitting, the view of Charleston's stages is pretty striking — and that's not only because a critic often snags those coveted center aisle seats. — Maura Hogan


Are Pay What You Will nights beneficial to theater companies?
Are Pay What You Will nights beneficial to theater companies? The Cost of Art

In 2006 the City Paper ran an article, "Pay to Play," about how Charleston's museums and theaters set their admission prices. The article referenced prices at Charleston Stage, where in 2006, a theater-goer could see a play for $25, and a musical for $35. — Connelly Hardaway


Fahamu Pecou's art grapples with cultural representations of African Americans
Fahamu Pecou's art grapples with cultural representations of African Americans Triumph Over Tragedy

In a July op-ed for ArtsATL, a nonprofit publication in Atlanta, visual artist Fahamu Pecou wrote a column titled, "Art Will Tell." In it he talks about the origins of his Halsey exhibition, DO or DIE: Affect, Ritual, Resistance, which opens this weekend. — Connelly Hardaway


How Charleston's major theaters plan to stand out on their own
How Charleston's major theaters plan to stand out on their own Playing Their Part

As Charleston's arts scene continues to grow and develop, the area has become home to an increasing number of performance venues, both large and small. — Dustin Waters


Fall Arts Picks

Pan American Modernism: Avant-Garde Art in Latin America and the United States

Pan American Modernism: Avant-Garde Art in Latin America and the United States

Gibbes Museum of Art

Tuesdays, Thursdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sundays, 1-5 p.m. and Wednesdays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Continues through Jan. 7

The Gibbes Museum of Art debuts its Pan American Modernism: Avant-Garde Art in Latin America and the United States exhibition on Oct. 6, showcasing the artistic presence of modernism across the Americas between 1919 and 1979. The focal point is "modernism as an intercontinental phenomenon" and how it manifested when combined with the influence of Latin American artists. "Pan American Modernism focuses on the breadth of modernism that exists in the Pan American regions and the similarities shared among individuals in these various parts of the Americas," says Angela Mack, executive director of the Gibbes. Mack's aim is to give the general public a fuller understanding of modernism and how it led to influence other art forms. The art will be divided into five sections: Mexican Muralism and Its Legacy, The Female Muse, Abstract Expressionism, Modernist Photography, and Geometric Abstraction and Its Legacy. Corresponding events with this exhibition include live music by the Garage Cuban Band, a public tour of the exhibit with curator Pam Wall, and a screening of a film about Cuban life.

Henri Matisse: Jazz & Poetry on Paper

Henri Matisse: Jazz & Poetry on Paper

Columbia Museum of Art

Through Jan. 15, 2018

Take a trip up I-95 this fall to check out the Columbia Museum of Art. If you're really smart about it you'll make the trek on a second Sunday, when admission is free. The museum is always rotating and refreshing its exhibits and starting this September you can check out a particularly cool one, Henri Matisse: Jazz & Poetry on Paper, which features 81 of Matisse's works. The early 20th century French artist was best known for his use of color in the modes of expressionism, post-impressionism, and Fauvism. On Fri. Sept. 15 Columbia Museum's curator, Catherine Walworth, leads a talk and tour, Cutouts, Courtiers, and Cowboys: Henri Matisse's Romantic Modernsim.

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