Tuesday, November 21, 2017

The Agenda: Court dismisses landmark school equity case; State doesn't have drugs to execute

WaPo calls Mulvaney "phony deficit hawk"

Posted by Sam Spence on Tue, Nov 21, 2017 at 12:24 PM

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Nearly a quarter cenury after a suit was brought alleging that rural S.C. schools are not funded equal to schools in more affluent areas of the state, the S.C. Supreme Court has dismissed the case, saying that Statehouse politicians have demonstrated enough good faith for the Court to step away from overseeing funding equity in education. Source: The State, P&C

CP columnist Baynard Woods in the NYT yesterday, calls Charles Manson, who died over the weekend, a "harbinger of white supremacist race warriors like Dylann Roof, the lunatic fringe of the alt-right." Source: NYT

With the state set to execute its first death row inmate in six years next month, corrections officials say they don't have the lethal injection chemicals needed to kill a convicted cop killer. In recent years, it has become harder for state to legally source the ingredients needed as companies have stopped selling the execution drugs. Source: The State, AP

Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer will speak at USC's winter commencement next month. Source: P&C

The first numbers from this year's open enrollment period for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act show that 85 percent of 11,000 new enrollees to sign up qualify for subsidized premiums. Source: P&C

After striking out trying to find a private company that wants to open a grocery store near the abandoned North Charleston Naval hospital, the city of North Charleston says it may work to open its own co-op in the area. Source: P&C

Washington Post editorial: "Mick Mulvaney, the phony deficit hawk President Trump tapped to oversee the nation’s budget, all but admitted on Sunday that the GOP tax plan currently before the Senate is built on fiction."


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Historic Francis Marion Hotel gets thumbs-up for an update

Views from the 843

Posted by Adam Manno on Tue, Nov 21, 2017 at 12:07 PM

PHOTO VIA INSTAGRAM/DAILYCHARLESTON
  • Photo via Instagram/dailycharleston
The Francis Marion Hotel received conceptual approval Monday night to install new windows in its guest rooms.

Hotel owner Steve Dopp, accompanied by architect Glenn Keyes, argued in front of the Board of Architectural Review that the windows installed for the 1996 re-opening are a source of common complaints from guests.

"Most of the damage to the hotel during Hurricane Matthew was caused due to water leaking through our windows," Dopp told the board.

Dopp and Keyes cited street noise from late-night partying as another reason for the major undertaking.

The windows in each of the 325 guest rooms and suites would be replaced, according to the plans submitted to the city. Part of why the Board voted unanimously for the conditional approval is that the updates would begin above the terra cotta band that delineates the start of the guest room section.

City architect Dennis Dowd requested that the windows on all four sides of the building match and blend in as much as possible before allowing the board to move for approval.

The move will also allow guests to finally open their windows up to five inches, which were shut due to water damage concerns. Dopp, who also owns the Middlebury Inn in Vermont, argued that the change is a long time coming.

"Ten years ago, the Historic Foundation and the Preservation Society did not look favorably upon this," Dopp said. "The Middlebury Inn had the new windows already. Frankly, the whole world has been going this way."







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Polls are open until 7 p.m. for Council District 6 and District 10 runoff elections

Run(off), Forrest, Run!

Posted by Adam Manno on Tue, Nov 21, 2017 at 9:45 AM

In District 6, incumbent Gregorie (left-right) faces Brennan in a runoff, while either Massey or Griffin will become the new councilman in District 10 West of the Ashley - FILE PHOTOS
  • File photos
  • In District 6, incumbent Gregorie (left-right) faces Brennan in a runoff, while either Massey or Griffin will become the new councilman in District 10 West of the Ashley
Four candidates who have been busy with some last-minute campaigning after Nov. 7 might be able to find some closure today.

Amy Brennan and incumbent William Dudley Gregorie are facing off once again in District 6, after the last election saw Brennan beat Gregorie by one vote. Still, neither of them got 50 percent of the votes for the Charleston/James Island seat when write-ins were included, which leads us to today.

In District 10, West Ashley voters will have a choice between 22-year-old Citadel graduate Harry Joseph Griffin and business development associate Summer Massey. On Nov. 7, Massey captured 43 percent of the vote to Griffin's 39.5 percent.

If you're a resident of either district — and you are registered to vote — you can check out a list of polling locations here. Also, click here to verify your registration status and polling location.

We will publish results as they become available.

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Monday, November 20, 2017

CofC professor to host a sequel to 16-year-old gentrification panel

People were not feeling the Starbucks invasion 16 years ago

Posted by Adam Manno on Mon, Nov 20, 2017 at 1:48 PM

Continued development further up the King Street-Meeting Street corridor will affect neighborhoods on either side of I-26 - JONATHAN BONCEK
  • Jonathan Boncek
  • Continued development further up the King Street-Meeting Street corridor will affect neighborhoods on either side of I-26
The age-old question of what is becoming of downtown Charleston will get some updated answers 16 years later.

College of Charleston sociology professor Paul Roof is re-creating a discussion put together by political science students at the college in November 2001. In the "sparsely attended forum," as written in the Dec. 5, 2001 issue of the City Paper, panelists and attendees discussed "the root causes and potential cures for the strip's growing struggle with gentrification."

"Do we really need three Starbuckses within a one-mile radius?" wondered small business consultant Manny Mello during a conversation that was dominated by concerns over national chains, rising rents, and malls.

Now, less than two months away from 2018 and closer to seven Starbuckses in a one-mile radius, Roof says it's time to re-examine the path Charleston has been on for the better part of two decades.

"The character of King Street has changed, with the gentrification of Upper King, I thought it would be fun to get some people together and sort of reflect on the state of affairs," Roof said.

Roof says that dramatic changes to the city's infrastructure tend to shock Charleston's newer residents, who are used to the polished, bustling nature of today's downtown.

"There was no such thing as Second Sunday on King," Roof said. "At the time of the panel, Marion Square was a dump. It was surrounded by chain-link fences and cars that worked in office buildings downtown."

Solutions proposed in the 2001 panel included training for small business owners and incentives for landlords to rent out to mom-and-pop shops. Roof hopes that a new discussion will generate some new ideas on how to best preserve the Holy City's charm. 

The discussion, named "Has King St. Become an Outdoor Mall?" will take place on Nov. 29 at 7 p.m. in the College's Education Center. Speakers have yet to be announced.

Check out the Facebook event page for updates.

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The Agenda: N. Chs. in midst of most-deadly two-year stretch; Supreme Court clarifies domestic violence ruling

SoS seal debacle could prompt legal challenges

Posted by Sam Spence on Mon, Nov 20, 2017 at 12:02 PM

CITY OF NORTH CHARLESTON
  • City of North Charleston
N. Chs. Mayor Keith Summey (left) and police Chief Eddie Driggers during a 2015 press conference following Walter Scott's death - PAUL BOWERS FILE PHOTO
  • Paul Bowers file photo
  • N. Chs. Mayor Keith Summey (left) and police Chief Eddie Driggers during a 2015 press conference following Walter Scott's death

North Charleston is in the midst of its most-deadly two-year stretch on record with 66 homicides. For their part, North Charleston Mayor Keith Summey and Police Chief Eddie Driggers, who Summey picked to lead the department in 2012, have reportedly shut down at least 10 P&C interview requests on the subject in the last month. Source: P&C

South Carolina is set to execute its first death row inmate in six years on December 1. Source: AP

A Supreme Court ruling late Friday clarified a ruling over the summer which some interpreted as having detrimental treatment of same-sex couples in S.C. Source: AP, P&C

Look for progress toward a resolution of the VC Summer Nuclear Station project in the coming weeks as SCE&G's parent company tries to recoup $2 billion in the form of a tax write-off if it walks away from the project in the coming weeks. Source: P&C

Reports Friday that S.C. Secretary of State Mark Hammond had neglected to formally affix the state seal to new state laws, a formality required in the S.C. Constitution, are prompting worries from some that the lapse could trigger a wave of legal challenges by folks looking to have lawsuits thrown out. Source: AP


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