The Indiana Jones trilogy heads to the Music Hall this Spring


Fortune and glory, kid

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The ideal date: dinner, movie, and Indiana Jones. We know we’re not wrong. On three special Mondays this month and next, the Charleston Music Hall screens the first three Indiana Jones flicks (we aren’t counting Kingdom of the Crystal Skull, sorry).

The venue is presenting a special deal with dinner at Vincent Chicco’s or Virginia’s on King for an additional $32 (movie tickets are just $8 for each flick). Guests must call for reservations at their desired restaurant after booking the Dinner & Show option. Tickets can be purchased online.

If you choose the dinner option you can look forward to Vincent Chicco’s dishes like pesto rubbed grilled pork tenderloin and pasta primavera. If you head to Virginia’s get ready for Southern classics like deviled eggs, crab cakes, and fried chicken.

For those of you unfamiliar with the Indiana Jones films, things kick off with Raiders of the Lost Ark, set in 1936 and featuring Indiana Jones (the incomparable Harrison Ford) trying to locate the “Ark of the Covenant” before the Nazis do.

The Temple of Doom is the adventure prequel (set a year earlier, in 1935) as archaeologist Indiana Jones tries to find wealth and fame in India. Through the help of his sidekick Short Round and a nightclub singer named Willie Scott, Jones goes on a quest to find a magical Sankara stone that leads him to encountering an ancient witch who harms all it comes in contact with.

The final flick (discounting, of course, the ol’ Crystal Skull), Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, starts in the year 1912 with 13-year-old Indiana attempting to recover an ornamental cross belonging to Francisco Vasquez de Coronado, a task he completes in 1938.

There’s been talk lately of a new Indiana Jones flick, deemed by most sources as “Indiana Jones 5,” which as of this past summer, was slated to come out sometime after the year 2020. Which is to say — don’t hold your breath.
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