The Agenda: FBI releases killer’s sketch of supposed Charleston-area victim; Graham criticizes Trump on Monday, coddles him on Tuesday


Put your Duke's up

The FBI has released a sketch drawn by a serial killer of a woman he says he killed in Charleston between 1977 and 1982. Samuel Little confessed to 93 murders, and investigators have been able to verify 50 so far and find all 93 claims to be credible. The sketch released this week is one of many released as the agency tries to piece together evidence. Source: FBI

More confusing name lawsuits: Duke’s Mayonnaise is suing Duke Brands and Duke Foods for copyright infringement. Eugenia Duke, the creator of Duke’s Mayonnaise, sold sandwiches out of a store in Greenville until she sold that part of the business in the 1920s to focus on the mayo. After years of peacefully coexisting, Duke’s Mayonnaise was recently sold to a new parent company, who is bringing the suit. And you thought Sink v. Sink was confusing. Source: WSPA

S.C. Sen. Lindsey Graham had some words for President Trump on Monday, calling the decision to pull American troops out of Syria and betraying Kurdish allies “unnerving to its core”, “a disaster in the making”, and probably most insulting for the President, “EXACTLY what President Obama did”. Source: The State

Not to be outdone by himself, on Tuesday, Graham called for Rudy Giuliani, currently serving as the president’s personal lawyer, to visit the Senate Judiciary Committee to answer questions about a Ukranian prosecutor who was fired as investigations reportedly ramped up against former Vice President Joe Biden’s son. Source: Twitter

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Jules Mappus of James Island is calling for higher barriers on the Ravenel Bridge to prevent suicides like her son’s. While the northbound lanes have barriers by the pedestrian lanes, the southbound side has no barrier. Source: Live 5

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FEATURE

Gaillard Center’s 2020-2021 season features Broadway musicals, chamber orchestras, and an iconic dance company

Connelly Hardaway

While so much of the world has seemed to come to a standstill, area arts organizations and venues continue to plan for their upcoming seasons — offering a shimmer of hope at the end of this coronavirus tunnel. The Gaillard Center promises “10 sensational performances” during this upcoming season, including two Lowcountry Broadway premieres.

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT

Gaillard Center’s 2020-2021 season features Broadway musicals, chamber orchestras, and an iconic dance company

While so much of the world has seemed to come to a standstill, area arts organizations and venues continue to plan for their upcoming seasons — offering a shimmer of hope at the end of this coronavirus tunnel. The Gaillard Center promises “10 sensational performances” during this upcoming season, including two Lowcountry Broadway premieres.

Brookgreen Gardens opens new outdoor exhibit, “Southern Light,” on May 15

Murrell’s Inlet’s Brookgreen Gardens is currently open, 9:30 a.m.-7 p.m. daily. And, after its original opening date was delayed due to the coronavirus pandemic, Bruce Munro’s massive outdoor light installation, Southern Light, will open to the public on Fri. May 15.

Sam Reynolds

Sam Reynolds, a Lowcountry folk songwriter who now resides in Vermont, released a collection of soft, subtle, and stirring piano instrumentals on May 1 titled Broken Tulips.

Charleston Wine + Food Festival says 2020 event had $19.9 million local economic impact

A survey by the College of Charleston reports that 54% of the 28,000 Charleston Wine + Food attendees were local.