The Agenda: Citadel cadets protesting mess hall conditions with hunger strike; Wilson signs on to Purdue settlement


We forgot what 50 degrees felt like

Citadel cadets are going on a hunger strike today to protest the conditions in the Coward Mess Hall. Posts on social media show undercooked chicken and brown-colored water, as well as sightings of rodents in the mess hall. Mess hall meals are included in the price of tuition, which for first year students is $30,022 for in-state and $53,278 for out-of-state. Source: P&C

State Attorney General Alan Wilson signed on to the settlement with Purdue Pharma, the makers of OxyContin and other opioids. The Sacklers, the family that owns Purdue Pharma, would pay $3 billion over seven years and give up control of the company, which recently declared bankruptcy. Twenty-three other states have already signed on, but the deal is facing criticism that it lets the family, which Forbes estimated in 2016 was worth $13 billion, off too easy. Source: The State / Washington Post

With a cold front moving in, Thursday and Friday of this week could feel like fall. The cold front is expected to bring temperatures down by 10 degrees, bringing the lows down to the mid-80s and the lows into the the 50s. Source: P&C

Speaking of weather, Tropical Storm Jerry is swirling in the Atlantic, “960 miles east of the Leeward Islands (and a lot farther than that from Charleston!)” Source: Chswx

Cokie Roberts, a venerated journalist and commentator known for her work with ABC and NPR, passed away from breast cancer complications at 75. Roberts was a part-time resident of Pawley’s Island. Source: New York Times

Support the Charleston City Paper

We’ve been covering Charleston since 1997 and plan to be here with the latest and Best of Charleston for many years to come. In a time where local journalism is struggling, the City Paper is investing in the future of Charleston as a place where diverse, engaging views can flourish. We can't do it without our readers. If you'd like to support local, independent journalism:

UP NEXT FROM

FEATURE

Gaillard Center’s 2020-2021 season features Broadway musicals, chamber orchestras, and an iconic dance company

Connelly Hardaway

While so much of the world has seemed to come to a standstill, area arts organizations and venues continue to plan for their upcoming seasons — offering a shimmer of hope at the end of this coronavirus tunnel. The Gaillard Center promises “10 sensational performances” during this upcoming season, including two Lowcountry Broadway premieres.

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT

Gaillard Center’s 2020-2021 season features Broadway musicals, chamber orchestras, and an iconic dance company

While so much of the world has seemed to come to a standstill, area arts organizations and venues continue to plan for their upcoming seasons — offering a shimmer of hope at the end of this coronavirus tunnel. The Gaillard Center promises “10 sensational performances” during this upcoming season, including two Lowcountry Broadway premieres.

Brookgreen Gardens opens new outdoor exhibit, “Southern Light,” on May 15

Murrell’s Inlet’s Brookgreen Gardens is currently open, 9:30 a.m.-7 p.m. daily. And, after its original opening date was delayed due to the coronavirus pandemic, Bruce Munro’s massive outdoor light installation, Southern Light, will open to the public on Fri. May 15.

Sam Reynolds

Sam Reynolds, a Lowcountry folk songwriter who now resides in Vermont, released a collection of soft, subtle, and stirring piano instrumentals on May 1 titled Broken Tulips.

Charleston Wine + Food Festival says 2020 event had $19.9 million local economic impact

A survey by the College of Charleston reports that 54% of the 28,000 Charleston Wine + Food attendees were local.