Lowcountry Hemp Festival will celebrate the benefits of hemp and CBD on 4/20


Celebrate 4/20

On Sat. Apr. 20, the Barrel on James Island is partnering with the Lowcountry National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML) for the first Lowcountry Hemp Festival.

Early last year, South Carolina joined 33 other states in having legal provisions for growing hemp, allowing 20 farmers to grow up to 20 acres to test the benefits of the crops for our environment, as well as the profit it could bring to the Lowcountry.

On Jan. 8 of this year, South Carolina legislature reconvened for its 2019-2020 session, with plans to bring up the issue of medical marijuana again.

“We realized the stigma around cannabis and CBD [cannabidiol] is the lack of knowledge on the subject,” said Kaylia Boshard of Lowcountry NORML. “A lot of folks still think hemp and CBD are illegal. So we really wanted to have a space where folks would feel safe asking questions and learning about the benefits of CBD.”

Partnering with Louis Miles, the owner and operator of CBD Carolinas, Boshard and Lowcountry NORML worked together to organize the Lowcountry Hemp Festival to spread awareness of hemp and CBD in an educational and safe way.

The event will be held at The Barrel (1859 Folly Rd.), featuring over 15 local vendors and companies, promoting and selling CBD products, jewelry, massage therapy, and all things organic and holistic. Rebel Taqueria will be onsite with their Cali-style street food, and music will be courtesy of tomatoband and DJ Skitch. The event is free, but donations will be collected at the door, and 10 percent of The Barrel’s sales will be donated to Lowcountry NORML.

Details and updates can be found on their Facebook event page.

Lowcountry NORML is a non-profit organization dedicated to create an environment of education, awareness, and advocacy for the safe use of marijuana, including hemp and CBD, in South Carolina.

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