Join Itinerant Literate Books in celebrating Banned Books Week now through Sept. 28


It's gonna be LIT(erature)

Now through Sept. 28, Itinerant Literate Books (ILB) hosts a week of activities in celebration of Banned Books Week, a country-wide awareness campaign that highlights the freedom to write and read without censorship.

Promoted by the American Library Association and Amnesty International, Banned Books Week celebrates the many controversial novels that are removed from schools and libraries all over the country.

Think you know everything about your fictional favorites? Make sure you bring your book-loving buddies to Itinerant Literate tonight, Mon. Sept. 23, for Banned Book Trivia. From 6 to 8 p.m., grab your favorite food and drinks and show off your literary knowledge with fellow book worms.

Do you ever wonder why books get censored in the first place? What’s the harm in censoring, anyway? On Tuesday stop by ILB and learn from former City Paper staff writer Paul Bowers as he discusses the dangers of censorship and banning.

Young adult fiction fans are in for a real treat on Thursday as YA authors Corrie Wang and Dhonielle Clayton will be present for the “Beasts and Belles Tour” to talk about their upcoming novels and explain why so many great YA novels are banned. The event will take place from 7 to 8:30 p.m., and their books will be available for signing, purchase, and pre-order afterward. [content-5] Make sure you don’t miss open mic night this Fri. Sept. 27, from 7 to 9 p.m. Step up on that soapbox and share your best stories, poems, or essays about banned books and censorship.

The week wraps up on Saturday with a finale party from 5 to 7 p.m. Live it up like Gatsby and come dressed as your favorite character from a banned book for a chance to win the costume contest.

All events are free to attend and open to all. Learn more online at itinerantliteratebooks.com.  [location-1]

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