Gibbes Museum of Art partners with Save the Arts to support federal funding for the arts


#SaveTheArts

The Gibbes Museum partners with Save the Arts in a national postcard writing campaign supporting federal funding for the arts. Visitors entering the museum’s admission-free first floor can grab postcards pre-addressed to South Carolina representatives, write a message about what the arts mean to them, and drop the postage paid cards into the museum mailbox. All postcards feature museum artwork.

The Save the Arts campaign expresses support for the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, which all face elimination under President Trump’s proposed budget.

Funds from the NEA and NEH support the arts and culture all over the United States, stretching from small and large museums to individual artists and local libraries. The Corporation for Public Broadcasting, or CPB, runs PBS and NPR and is also supported by public donations.

Trump has proposed eliminating the three agencies as part of a slew of cuts across the board to pay for increased defense and military spending. Combined, the NEA, NEH, and CPB received $741 billion in 2016 — just 0.016 percent of the federal budget.

It is worth noting that while arts funding is in potential danger, barring any approval of Trump’s proposed federal budget, arts groups are still going strong. In Charleston alone the NEA has recently doled out a number of grants for the Office of Cultural Affairs, the Charleston Parks Conservancy, and the Halsey Institute.

If you can’t make it to the museum but are still interested in sending a postcard, Save the Arts has a template and instructions for printing and mailing your own.

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