Gibbes Museum of Art announces 2018-2019 exhibits, from printmaking to political sculpture


Two new exhibits open this April

Last Spring we hit y’all with the Gibbes’ latest exhibition announcements (including news of A Shared Legacy: Folk Art in America, which debuted this January) and yesterday the Gibbes shared the rest of their 2018 exhibition schedule, featuring works that span centuries, mediums, race, and gender.
[content-3] A Shared Legacy: Folk Art in America is currently on display at the Gibbes, featuring American folk art made between 1800-1925. Now through April 15 you can check out rare portraits, still-life paintings, allegorical scenes, animal sculptures, and furniture from the German-American community.


Starting on April 27, Radcliffe Bailey’s Pensive will be on display at the Gibbes, featuring the work of the internationally renowned, Atlanta-based painter, sculptor, and mixed-media artist. Pensive highlights Bailey’s “poetic and experimental approach” to his site-specific installations, including Storm at Sea, in which Bailey utilizes piano keys, an African sculpture, and a glitter-covered ship to suggest motifs associated with the trans-Atlantic slave trade.


Also on display starting on April 27, Printmaking: Process to Product is an exhibition that spans the 16th century to the present, and explores the Gibbes’ print collection while focusing on the specific processes used to create the works. The installation pairs prints with plates, blocks, and printmaking tools from the museum archives to help make the connection between technique and the finished product. Printmakers Albrecht Durer, James McNeill Whistler, Jasper Johns, and Kara Walker will be featured.

A Dark Place of Dreams: Louise Nevelson with Chakaia Booker, Lauren Fensterstock, and Kate Gilmore opens at the Gibbes on Sept. 28. Nevelson was considered one of the pioneering American sculptors of the 20th century, and A Dark Place of Dreams revisits her monochromatic assemblages, which were on display in the Gibbes’ main gallery 35 years ago for Spoleto Festival USA 1983.

Presented alongside Nevelson’s sculptures are works from contemporary artists Chakaia Booker, Lauren Fensterstock, and Kate Gilmore. According to the National Museum of Women in the Arts (nmwa.org), Booker’s work “fuses ecological concerns with explorations of racial and economic difference, globalization, and gender, by recycling discarded tires into complex assemblages.”

Fensterstock creates paper installations out of her home studio in Portland, Maine. Last year the Maine Arts Journal wrote about her work in “Nasty Maine Women Artists.” Fensterstock said, “I see being an artist as a political act. In a corporate culture of conglomerates it is difficult to have an unmediated voice. I strongly do not make art for my own pleasure. I make art for dialogue.”

New York City-based artist Gilmore has been described by Time Out New York as one of the city’s “most dependably engrossing artists as a reflection of the current political situation.” Her sculptures, including one on display at the Gibbes, “Rock, Hard, Place,” are often large and colorful (and clearly, political).

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