Former Cone 10 co-owner helping open Studio Union in North Charleston’s Union Heights neighborhood

Help 'em out on GoFundMe


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This summer Cone 10, an arts hub for local ceramicists, finally closed its doors, after years of waiting for their lease to end. The building, located on Morrison Drive, will become, like so many places in Charleston, an apartment complex.

Many of the Cone 10 ceramicists set up shop in their own homes and some are still working to create mini Cone 10-esque studios of their own in suburbs around town. Meanwhile, one of Cone 10’s owners, Susan Gregory, found a location for what you could call Cone 10 2.0, a warehouse in Union Heights.

Gregory and a friend (someone who prefers to stay behind the scenes) hope to have this new space, Studio Union, up and running in a few months. Interested in seeing a new arts space open in Charleston (yes, of course)? Then check out Studio Union’s GoFundMe.

Two miles from Cone 10’s former spot on Morrison Drive, Studio Union is in an industrial/residential neighborhood, and Gregory wants the space to mesh well with its neighbors. So far, so good — she says some residents have already expressed interest in classes.

“I’m building from what I have experience with at Cone 10,” says Gregory. “I’m trying to create something more on the professional side,” adding that a number of artists in town have expressed interest in the space.

Two-thirds of Studio Union will likely be ceramics space, and the remaining “flank” of the building will be divided into artist studios.

“We’re just trying to make a space where we can all work and stay without being run off again,” says Gregory. “A lot of us are trying to put down roots and make a creative life in whatever way. This feels like a great space to spread North and South.”

Follow along with Studio Union’s progress on their ‘gram.

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