Charleston Library of Things announces crowdfunding campaign to let you check out all their things

More space, fewer things


The sharing economy has changed the way we live and travel. Now, a new company is building upon the idea of the sharing economy and trying to change the way we own and use things.

The Charleston Library of Things (CHSLOT), founded by Anne Herford, has announced a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo, aiming to raise $40,000 for a mobile lending library of tools and other household goods that will serve the greater Charleston community.

A library of things is just like a normal library, but instead of books, the shelves are stocked with commonly needed, but not often used items. The CHSLOT will begin with the core categories of home improvement and gardening tools, kitchen countertop appliances, and DIY equipment.

Additional categories can include seasonal items such as camping gear, or entertainment items such as board games.
Instead of buying and storing costly items that take up space and are rarely needed, CHSLOT’s goal is to make them available to borrow through an annual membership. To maximize community accessibility, the cost of membership will be on a sliding scale.

CHSLOT hopes to offer more than just home-goods and tools by building a community through repair cafes, community classes, and a sharing blog. These platforms will help members extend the lives of the things they already own, teach them how to use the items they borrow, and share their experiences with the library.

While sharing libraries can be found around the world, with only a few in the Southeast, CHSLOT will be the first of its kind in South Carolina.

The campaign is now live and will run through Nov. 1. To contribute to the campaign and to become a sponsor and/or member, check out their Indiegogo and their website. If you have any questions, email Herford, anne@chslot.com.

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