Catch a creepy Mrs. Claus, looney lunch ladies, and a haunted video game at the Crimson Screen film fest


Things that go bump in Park Circle

First thing’s first: Tickets for this year’s Crimson Screen Horror Film Fest, which kicks off next Fri. May 25, are sold out. Bummer, I know. The good news is that there is a slight chance you can still snag tickets — just show up to the screening you’re interested in, and if there are seats available, you can purchase one of a limited number of daily seat tickets. Now that we’ve gotten that out of the way, on to the good stuff: The scary flicks.

The fifth annual Crimson Screen Horror Film Fest features 61 horror films from all over the world, including 10 feature films and 51 shorts, which fall under the categories of documentary, thriller, animation, comedy, WTF?, shocker, and foreign. Attendees are encouraged to dress in costume to walk the dREaD carpet.

In a press release festival founder Tommy Faircloth says, “We are excited to also shine a special spotlight on our South Carolina Filmmakers. We are hosting three world premieres of SC-produced features films, Livescream, Bobby, and What Becomes of Us.

Feature films include:
Livescream: Get it? Like a take on livestream? This world premiere, S.C.-produced flick is about a popular video game streamer who accidentally starts playing a haunted game — with deadly consequences.

Bong of the Living Dead: If the title doesn’t give it away, this scary film (which we assume has got to be pretty funny, too) is about five friends who share a love of pot and a dream to see the zombie apocalypse become a reality. Us too, us too.

Stirring: The bad guy in this movie is Mrs. Claus. That’s right, co-eds attending an Xmas party at a sorority house are stalked by a killer disguised as Santa’s missus.

Shorts include:
Skin Baby: A tattoo comes to life. Need we say more?

Lunch Ladies: “Two burned out high school lunch ladies do whatever it takes on their quest to become Johnny Depp’s personal chefs.”

I Baked Him A Cake: Clocking in at five minutes, this flick promises to “subvert the typical paradigm” of how women are portrayed in horror films. Sign us up.

Check out the full film schedule online.

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