Call for artists: Enough Pie needs your help painting the columns under I-26


Mural makeover

In an exciting moment for public art in the city, local community-building nonprofit Enough Pie has secured permission to paint murals on the columns under a portion of I-26 off upper King Street. At the end of Simons Street and north of Romney Street is an area that the group is calling “the people’s park.”

In a press release, EP describes the people’s park as an area that is “commonly used by local residents as a route downtown” and one that is a “vital asset for a community connection between the East and West Side of Charleston.”

Now through Mon. Dec. 2, EP is accepting artist applications to paint murals on the 12 columns located in the area. Installation will take place this spring, with a late May/early June launch of the revitalized park.

Have a submission? Send it to info@enoughpie.org or call (843) 972-3253.

This project is presented as part of EP’s Awakening 8: Weave the People, a year-long series of creative, community events. Weave the People is both the series’ theme and an organization itself, one that embraces practices “to support purpose, wholeness, and self-management.”

Together, EP and Weave the People hope that this year’s Awakening and its associated events and creative endeavors will spotlight “social fragmentation throughout the upper Peninsula.”

The renewal effort is a group collaboration that includes neighborhood associations, council members, and the EP “steering circle,” composed of local residents.

Learn more about Enough Pie online at enoughpie.org.

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