Wednesday, January 30, 2008

Edwards' Greatest Press Time Moments

Posted by Greg Hambrick on Wed, Jan 30, 2008 at 11:26 AM

Colbert Takes On Edwards, Oct. 28:

Swampland has news on a war of words between Colbert and fellow native South Carolinian John Edwards.

“John Edwards left South Carolina when he was 1 year old. He had his chance. Saying his parents moved him — that’s the easy answer.”

The Edwards campaign fought back:

Edwards was born in South Carolina, learned to walk in South Carolina, learned to talk to in South Carolina, and will kick Stephen Colbert’s New York City butt in South Carolina.

“Stephen Colbert claims to represent a new kind of politics, but today we see he’s participating in the slash and burn politics that has no place in American discourse. The truthiness is, as the candidate of Doritos, Colbert’s hands are stained by corporate corruption and nacho cheese. John Edwards has never taken a dime from salty food lobbyists and America deserves a President who isn’t in the pocket of the snack food special interests.”

Woman with worst seat gets Edwards ad time, Nov. 26:

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Edwards, Belafonte to make Charleston stop Thursday-O, Dec. 5

News Wrap, Dec. 10:

• John Edwards is dragging Kevin Bacon around Iowa. I’m waiting for the YouTube where they do the Footloose dance together. That would show Chuck Norris! Think this has nothing to do with Oprah? You wish. The same press release announces the formation of the John Edwards Book Club. Not kidding.

Edwards Rally: "Could You Fill The Empty Space?", Jan. 21:

At a campaign rally in Myrtle Beach, a man jumped onstage and pleaded into a microphone, “Could you fill the empty space?” He urged the people in the back to cluster around the stage. “This is a rally, people.”

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The Tale of RapunzEdwards, Jan. 25:

The problem is that there’s nothing new about it. In a debate last week in Nevada, moderator Tim Russert all but accused Edwards of standing in the way of the nation’s first black or first woman president. Ouch. …

When you’re talking about three strikingly strong candidates, biography matters — and “the son of a mill worker” was sooo 2004. As is the rich vs. poor narrative that has been Edwards’ sole argument to South Carolina voters. It’s not that the problem has gone away, but class rarely gets noticed when race and sex are in play.

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