Thursday, May 10, 2018

Mary Edna Fraser and daughters present new works, 'Family Ties,' at the Vendue this month

Batik at it

Posted by Connelly Hardaway on Thu, May 10, 2018 at 2:58 PM

click to enlarge PROVIDED
  • Provided
Did you know that local batik artist Mary Edna Fraser (who last year made a pretty big statement with her building-size piece, 100-foot all-weather banner, hung on the Joseph Floyd Manor as part of Enough Pie's Awakening: King Tides) has two creative daughters? The family of makers displays their works together at Gallery 26 at the Vendue Art Hotel, starting on Thurs. May 24 with an opening reception. Family Ties is curated by The Southern's Erin and Justin Nathanson.
In a press release the show is described as "an exploration of the interconnectedness of a family of makers: the matriarch, batikist, printmaker, and oil painter, Mary Edna Fraser; youngest daughter and multimedia artist, Reba West Fraser; and eldest daughter and performance artist, Labanna Babalon."

click to enlarge Reba and Labanna are the daughters of Mary Edna Fraser and West Fraser, two locally based artists. - PROVIDED
  • Provided
  • Reba and Labanna are the daughters of Mary Edna Fraser and West Fraser, two locally based artists.
Recently (and ironically), Mary Edna developed allergies to the chemistry of the batik process, which has led to her utilizing more oil painting. In Family Ties, Mary Edna will present a new body of these oil paintings, as well as four new batiks she created along with her daughter Reba.

Reba, who currently resides in Asheville — and owns thrift shop Hey Okay Good Goodies — creates multimedia pieces, with a focus in painting, printmaking, and ceramics. Her works in Family Ties reflect passages from her childhood. She says, "Art is in my blood and anytime I try to escape it, I always find myself coming back and feeling at home in the chaos and comfort it brings."

click to enlarge Labanna Babalon uses her body as a medium. - PROVIDED
  • Provided
  • Labanna Babalon uses her body as a medium.

Labanna Babalon, the performance artist of the family, uses her body as a medium, and, using her mother's activism for the planet as inspiration, focuses on liberating the act of ownership. A press release says, "Focusing on the theme of 'Family Ties' she wants to work with her family's ancestors to start the painful process of healing the more traumatic southern legacies."

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