Wolf Parade did not disappoint the dedicated 

A live review from the Pour House

Wolf Parade
Pour House
Nov. 8

The Montreal-based Wolf Parade played their first-ever show in Charleston on Monday at the Pour House. Unfortunately, due to a schedule conflict, I missed Japanese post-punk band Ogre You Asshole, the openers of the night. From the doorman to crowd, though, plenty in attendance raved about the band's performance.

Wolf Parade came on stage shortly thereafter. Guitarist/vocalist Dan Boeckner congratulated Charleston for making Huffington Post's #1 Most Attractive People, before bursting into "Language City." Though Boeckner was the one singing the lyrics, "We are not at home," he seemed to be the most comfortable on the stage, his jittery movements providing the most stage presence out of the quartet. Keyboardist/vocalist Spencer Krug spent most of the show hidden behind his keyboards, only acknowledging the audience for some occasional banter.

Most of the night's set drew from the band's third effort, Expo 86, released earlier this year, including "What Did My Lover Say," the up-tempo "Cave-O-Sapien," and "Little Golden Age," which sounded noticeably emptier, stripped of its big production.

Expectably, the audience was excited most for tracks from the band's debut Apologies to the Queen Mary. "You Are A Runner and I am My Father's Son" squeezed its way into the set fairly early on, while the one-two of "This Heart's On Fire" and "I'll Believe In Anything" saw the band's energy at its highest. Little attention was given to the band's sophomore effort At Mount Zoomer, with the exception of live-staple "Fine Young Cannibals" and "California Dreamer."

While energy was lacking from the band overall, many in the audience were singing along, their enthusiasm summed up by one guy in the audience, who shouted, "I've been waiting six years for this!"


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