With the water gone, Charleston begins to realize the full effects of the 1,000-year storm 

After the Flood

click to enlarge Bridgeview residents found themselves unable to come and go with the flooding

Jonathan Boncek

Bridgeview residents found themselves unable to come and go with the flooding

There is no way to over-exaggerate the impact of the storm that began October 2, blanketing the entire state of South Carolina with an estimated four-months of rain in just a few days. All you have to do is look at the current photos from the tiny town of St. Andrews — more than a week after the event — to see how devastating the deluge has been and will continue to be. In this issue, we’ve tried to look at a few of the ways the Holy City was affected by this 1,000-year storm, from the events that were canceled to the lives that have been forever changed. Our thoughts and prayers are with all of those who will continue to feel the storm’s effects for days, if not months and years, to come.

Weather Service releases report on last year’s historic floods
Weather Service releases report on last year’s historic floods Study cites local ‘internet troll’

The National Weather Service released a 113-page report detailing the historic flooding that occurred across South Carolina last October that left 19 dead and caused almost $1.5 billion in damages. — Dustin Waters


Area events and tourism were hit hard by this month's devastating flooding
Area events and tourism were hit hard by this month's devastating flooding Weekend Shut Down

The 1,000-year storm may be over, but Charleston is still feeling its impact. We talked to area event organizers and masters of the Lowcountry tourism trade to get an idea of how much revenue Aquageddon cost them. Numbers aside, numerous organizations suffered serious heartbreak from a weekend of canceled events. — Connelly Hardaway


What the storm means for local farmers and how you can help
What the storm means for local farmers and how you can help Field of Broken Dreams

As the waters slowly recede, residents of South Carolina will begin to assess the damage caused by the incredible amount of rain, severe winds, high tides, and ultimately the record-breaking flooding. For farmers across the state of South Carolina, hard decisions will have to be made as they survey their fields and determine, what, if anything can be done to salvage their fall crops. — Nikki Seibert Kelley


Let's not be lulled once again into ignoring the awesome might of Mother Nature
Let's not be lulled once again into ignoring the awesome might of Mother Nature A Reminder

In Charleston, we dodged a bullet given the relatively minor damage we received last week from Hurricane Joaquin, which helped funnel a ceaseless stream of precipitation across South Carolina. Relatively speaking, we were blessed. Despite receiving the equivalent of four months of rainfall in just a few days, the Charleston area was largely spared from the worst after-effects of Hurricane Joaquin's wake. — Dwayne Green


So what did we learn from the last week's flooding?
So what did we learn from the last week's flooding? And the Rains Came...

The deluge which soaked our state and still threatens some downstream communities more than a week later has shown the best and the worst in South Carolina. The media has given us plenty of inspirational stories about neighbors helping neighbors, even at risk to their own safety, and churches and civic groups collecting money, food, and clothing to help those who have lost everything. These are all worthy efforts. — Will Moredock


After 30,000 tweets and seven years, the forecast for @chswx shows no sign of letting up
After 30,000 tweets and seven years, the forecast for @chswx shows no sign of letting up Tweeting Up a Storm

If you've ever woken up during a storm, rolled over to check your phone and saw breaking storm updates on Twitter in the dead of night, that was probably the work of Jared Smith, the one-man weather service behind @chswx. "I can't sleep when there's a thunderstorm," Smith says. "I just get too excited." — Sam Spence


Flood victims return home after finding hope in North Charleston shelter
Flood victims return home after finding hope in North Charleston shelter A New Ark

At North Charleston United Methodist Church on Tuesday, Pastor Wendy Hudson-Jacoby leads the blessing for what will be the final meal inside the temporary shelter. Forced to evacuate due to flooding, many of the families inside will soon be leaving to see their homes for the first time since the storm began. — Dustin Waters


Charleston-area oyster season closes two days after it began
Charleston-area oyster season closes two days after it began Bye-valves

On Sat. Oct. 3, as rain from a 1,000-year storm pummeled the Carolina coast, S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control issued a statement: shellfish harvesting in St. Helena Sound, the Coosaw River, and to the mouth of Bull River was closed. The announcement came just two days after the start of the 2015-16 shellfish season. In an already wet fall, clammer David Belanger calls the financial cost of the closure huge. — Kinsey Gidick


Flooding leaves Bridgeview apartment complex residents trapped
Flooding leaves Bridgeview apartment complex residents trapped Stranded

As days of heavy rain swelled the Cooper River, residents of the Bridgeview Village apartment complex were trapped. Even Monday evening, the community’s two main exits on North Romney Street remained impassable for most vehicles. With the help of police, residents of the 300-unit complex say they were able to move the dumpsters blocking a single-lane road that cuts through the woods surrounding the complex. Although it doesn’t have a name, that road now serves as the only way in or out of the neighborhood. But for the first few days, even it was too flooded to use. — Dustin Waters


Classified Listings

Powered by Foundation   © Copyright 2017, Charleston City Paper   RSS