The Shock T's are a pitch perfect musical-comedic threesome 

Not even a flight delay could faze these guy

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The opening night performance of the Shock T's began with an unexpected hiccup. Tyler Patterson, the musical trio's guitar man, was still at the Charleston airport at 10 p.m. when the three were scheduled to begin. Patterson's plane had been delayed, so the group's two other members, Tim Dunn and Sarah Shockey, did what comedians tend to do best — they improvised (with a little help from the rest of the Theatre 99 crew).

The makeshift improv group distracted the audience for about 45 minutes with hilarious bits about internet scams and an AC unit gasping for its life. After a brief intermission, Shockey and Dunn bounded onstage, looking only slightly flustered, and announced they would begin their scheduled programming just as soon as Patterson finished tuning his guitar. For jumping straight from an airplane to a car to a Piccolo Spoleto stage, Patterson was surprisingly calm and collected. The only thing that seemed to be bugging him was that he didn't have his guitar strap, and even that seemed to worry Shockey more than Patterson.

The second half of the show was musical-comedic genius. The audience laughed for the next hour as The Shock T's performed a series of catchy songs like the infamous "Penis song." The trio was pitch perfect. Their remix of the dance hit "Barbie Girl," which slows the tempo of the original song way down and casts Barbie in the light of a sad, abused girlfriend and Ken as a mean, insensitive alpha male, was particularly clever and fun to watch.

What makes this threesome so fun to watch? Their infectious onstage presence, for one. Their song "Threesome" was introduced with the glib statement, "This is a song about us."

This critic's favorite, Sarah Shockey, is charming whether she's belting out harmonies, which she does quite well, or thinking of all the naughty places in the baby pool where she might have put her penis. She plays the guy's girl, the Barbie girl, and the drunk girl with the same ease. Tim Dunn is a great counterpart to Shockey, with his perfect comedic timing and a practiced air of seriousness about his characters that makes them both believable and hysterical. Patterson, meanwhile, didn't miss a note during the whole performance, even without his guitar strap. He kept the other two grounded, and he has an endearing quality, even when he's forcefully singing, "Thanks for the BJ, but I'm not your boyfriend!"

The chemistry of The Shock T's cannot be denied. Last night's show ran until almost midnight, but no one was complaining. When it was time for the final set of the night, the audience grumbled, to which Dunn responded, "Funny songs are really hard to write!" It's their fault for making it look so easy.

Piccolo Spoleto. The Shock T's. $16. I hour. Theatre 99, 280 Meeting Street. (866) 811-4111

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