The Death of Walter Scott 

A North Charleston police officer shot a man in the back, and a bystander caught it all on video. What happens next?

The morning of Saturday, April 4, Walter Scott was shot and killed following a traffic stop off of Remount Road in North Charleston. Early reports stated that North Charleston Patrolman Michael Thomas Slager fired his gun during a struggle after Scott tried to take the officer's Taser. But video taken by a bystander showed Slager firing toward Scott as he ran away. Since then, Slager has been fired and charged with murder, a SLED investigation into the incident continues, and voices from across the country are calling for action after the incident that resulted in Scott's death.

Mourners and activists visit the site of Walter Scott’s death on anniversary
Mourners and activists visit the site of Walter Scott’s death on anniversary Remembrance and hope for real change

One year after the death of Walter Scott, members of the North Charleston community are still looking for ways to come to grips with what has happened. Visiting the gravesite of his brother, Anthony Scott said it’s still a troubled time for the family, and the pain of losing a loved one remains an everyday part of life. — Dustin Waters


<i>Chelsea Does</i> offers an outsider’s look at Walter Scott’s death and race in the South
Chelsea Does offers an outsider’s look at Walter Scott’s death and race in the South New eyes, old problems

In Chelsea Handler’s new documentary series on Netflix, the comedian and talk show host begins her discussion of racism with a story from her childhood. Although the episode opens with Handler bouncing between California and New York, eventually ending up overseas, a large portion of the show is spent in South Carolina, namely Charleston. — Dustin Waters


Officer indicted on murder charge in Walter Scott case
Officer indicted on murder charge in Walter Scott case Michael T. Slager could face 30 years to life for April 4 shooting

A Charleston County grand jury indicted former North Charleston Police Department Officer Michael Thomas Slager Monday morning on a charge of murder in the case of the death of Walter Lamer Scott. — Paul Bowers


A month after Walter Scott's shooting, activists still calling for civilian police oversight
A month after Walter Scott's shooting, activists still calling for civilian police oversight Keeping a Watch

In the month since a North Charleston police officer was filmed shooting Walter L. Scott as he tried to run away following a routine traffic stop, activist and community groups have been calling for the creation of a citizen review board that would have the ability to oversee investigations into civilian complaints against police officers. — Paul Bowers


On the cover: Phillip Hyman’s Walter Scott piece
On the cover: Phillip Hyman’s Walter Scott piece The North Charleston artist explains the process behind ‘REAL Life and Death’

You’re probably already familiar with the piece of art featured on the cover of today’s print edition. Protesters have carried it at numerous activist events since the April 4 killing of Walter Scott in North Charleston, and media outlets including CNN and The Atlantic have featured photographs of it. The piece, titled “REAL Life and Death,” was created by North Charleston artist Phillip Hyman shortly after the news broke of Scott’s shooting. — Paul Bowers


Walter Scott's death is proof the system doesn't work
Walter Scott's death is proof the system doesn't work Broken

The widespread outrage since the killing of Walter Scott 11 days ago by a North Charleston police officer has been palpable. The reaction has been wildly "different" from other stories of police shootings in numerous ways, but there is still an underlying current that is not really understood by many people — even those who are upset by what they saw in the video. — Mat Catastrophe


Protests in wake of Walter Scott murder remind us what democracy looks like
Protests in wake of Walter Scott murder remind us what democracy looks like Say It Loud

We're in the sun, sitting on a swing on the College of Charleston campus. It's a beautiful afternoon, and it's quiet except for the birds and the occasional conversation about the death of Walter Scott. — Alison Piepmeier


#BlackLivesMatterCHS: What they want
#BlackLivesMatterCHS: What they want Protesters push for Citizens Review Board to oversee North Charleston cops

A group called Black Lives Matter - Charleston has been setting the tone for protest actions following the April 4 shooting death of Walter L. Scott, and they have a very specific demand: They want the city of North Charleston to create a Citizens Review Board to oversee the actions of the police department. — Paul Bowers


Walter Scott attended program for dads who are behind on child support payment
Walter Scott attended program for dads who are behind on child support payment Man who was killed by police officer received training in how to interact with law enforcement

The first time John Singletary met Walter Scott, the man whose April 4 death at the hands of North Charleston Police Officer Michael T. Slager has now attracted worldwide attention, Scott had fallen behind on child support payments, according to Singletary, and was trying to change his situation. — Paul Bowers


Prayer walk to begin Saturday at 5 p.m. at Walter Scott site
Prayer walk to begin Saturday at 5 p.m. at Walter Scott site Eight Methodist churches to host vigil along Remount Road

A vigil and prayer walk will begin at 5 p.m. on April 11 at the site of Walter Scott’s shooting death on Craig Road near Remount Road in North Charleston. — Paul Bowers


The Walter Scott murder only increases the mistrust between the black community and police
The Walter Scott murder only increases the mistrust between the black community and police Sick and Tired

If you're reading this column, there's a good chance that you're either in Charleston or a native of the city, so the following shouldn't be news to you: On April 4 Walter L. Scott, a 50-year-old black man, was shot in the back by North Charleston Patrolman 1st Class Michael T. Slager. — K.J. Kearney


Officer Slager’s record shows CPR and Taser training, two complaints
Officer Slager’s record shows CPR and Taser training, two complaints 2013 complainant said NCPD cop, now accused of murdering Walter Scott, tased him ‘for no reason’

The employment record of North Charleston Police Department Officer Michael T. Slager shows that Slager excelled in basic training, received CPR certification, and was the subject of two citizen complaints. One of the complaints alleged that Slager wrongfully used a Taser on a man who was not a suspect, but Slager was exonerated by the police department. — Paul Bowers


Study found racial disparities in North Charleston city hiring
Study found racial disparities in North Charleston city hiring African Americans make up 47 percent of North Charleston but just 19 percent of its police force

In a city where 47 percent of the population is African-American, just 19 percent of sworn personnel in the North Charleston Police Department are black, according to a department spokesman. — Paul Bowers


SLED awaiting approval to release Walter Scott dash cam footage
SLED awaiting approval to release Walter Scott dash cam footage Eyewitness comes forward, NCPD releases Slager’s records

The S.C. Law Enforcement Division (SLED) has dashboard camera footage from Saturday’s encounter between Walter Scott and North Charleston Police Officer Michael T. Slager, and a spokesman says he hopes to release the footage “soon.” — Paul Bowers


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