The 2013 Fall Arts Issue

 For this year’s Fall Arts Issue, we wanted to focus on reaching across boundaries — of race, geography, and others that are harder to define.

Part of the reason for that, of course, is that this issue was created in the long shadow cast by the June 17 massacre at the Emanuel AME Church. Art has a way of connecting people, of exposing us to viewpoints and ideas that we would otherwise never encounter. And that will be particularly important as Charleston continues to address the vital questions of race that the Emanuel Nine threw into violent relief.

In the following pages, you’ll find stories of artists who are working in the margins, or creating links between their own communities and those far away — whether literally or figuratively. It’s our own small way of contributing to the conversation. Enjoy.

This season, Charleston arts orgs are getting cozy with each other
This season, Charleston arts orgs are getting cozy with each other They're all in this together

As another season opens on Charleston's stellar art scene, there's one thing that's impossible not to notice: everyone's getting all mixed up in each other's business. In a good way. — Elizabeth Pandolfi


Keeping an eye on the CSO music director search
Keeping an eye on the CSO music director search Candidates will perform a show each

For the past couple of years, the Charleston Symphony Orchestra's Yuriy Bekker has been filling the role of both concertmaster and acting artistic director, but that period is drawing to a close. — Elizabeth Pandolfi


The IMPROVables kick off improv with a game show twist
The IMPROVables kick off improv with a game show twist PROVing the IMPROVable

Keep a close eye on the IMPROVables, a brand new Charleston comedy troupe specializing in a Whose Line Is It Anyway-style game. These funny people found each other in various spots on the local comedy scene and made their ties official in May, when they gave the group a name. — Kelly Rae Smith


Paula McInerny paints her way at Redux
Paula McInerny paints her way at Redux Different Strokes

When it comes to painting tools, Paula McInerny will almost always choose a palette knife over a paintbrush. She's in good company — masters like Cézanne, Rembrandt, and Van Gogh were also known for using palette knives, which can layer paint thickly on a canvas and create broad, bold strokes. — Elizabeth Pandolfi


John McWilliams and Nancy Marshall hitch a sweet ride
John McWilliams and Nancy Marshall hitch a sweet ride Snaps and Starts

A car club isn't necessarily an obvious choice for a photo series, but that's probably what makes John McWilliams and Nancy Marshall so good at what they do: they see possibility in unlikely places. — Elizabeth Pandolfi


All that's fit to print with Kate MacNeil
All that's fit to print with Kate MacNeil MacNeil rolls it on

Artists have a reputation for being flighty, sporadic, impulsive, and unpredictable. But then there's Kate MacNeil. A painter and printmaker, MacNeil is thoughtful, methodical, and even scientific in her creations. — Melissa Tunstall


Producer Jeffrey Jelks breaking down walls
Producer Jeffrey Jelks breaking down walls Jelks on a mission with eye on the future

"I have a letter up on my bulletin board that I must have written when I was eight years old, and it is instructing my cousins, who were coming to visit for the summer, to make sure they knew which commercials they wanted to recreate because we were gonna put on a show," theater producer Jeffery Jelks says. — Kelly Rae Smith


Charleston Symphony Orchestra’s new young patron group is out to revamp classical music’s image
Charleston Symphony Orchestra’s new young patron group is out to revamp classical music’s image Classical Music Remix

If classical music makes you think of old, Austrian men with funny wigs who wear knee-grazing britches, let the Charleston Symphony Orchestra remix that for you. The CSO’s new young patron group — appropriately named Remix — wants to show you that classical music has a story to tell, and that tale isn’t stuffy. — Melissa Tunstall


Threshold creates huge musicals in a little theater
Threshold creates huge musicals in a little theater Thinking Outside the Black Box

Here’s the problem with reviving a classic musical: On the one hand, it’s a classic because people love it. On the other, because people love it, you’d better treat it well — or else. — Dan Conover


Vince Musi, National Geographic photog extraordinaire
Vince Musi, National Geographic photog extraordinaire Portrait of an Animal

I’m headed to Florida right now to photograph a guy with a cougar,” Vince Musi says. He’s working on a piece for National Geographic on people with exotic pets, and the cougar guy is one of his latest subjects. — Elizabeth Pandolfi


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