Sherrie Zabinski 
Member since Jul 30, 2015


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Recent Comments

Re: “Blondie the horse's accident raises moral questions about the carriage tour industry

Gail Kof. Are you aware the average draft horse weighs between 1500 and 2000 pounds. You don't hear any horses cry because they don't cry! You dern sure don't hear carriage horses cry. Never happens nor has it happened. You seem to be very uninformed about horses. You certainly are the definition of ultracrepidarian!

Posted by Sherrie Zabinski on April 20, 2017 at 8:01 PM

Re: “What your S.C. barbecue sauce preference means in the state's presidential primary

Vinegar sauce is NOT a Lowcountry sauce. That is the Midlands. The Lowcountry has always been mustard sauce. I cut my teeth on it and so did most people over 30 that I know and that are from here. I also am not a Ted Cruz fan at all. Way to go in trying to make a political statement out of BBQ sauce. Isn't anything sacred anymore?!

12 of 20 people like this.
Posted by Sherrie Zabinski on February 16, 2016 at 3:18 PM

Re: “How well do you know the shared history of blacks and whites in Charleston?

First let me congratulate you on taking the tour guide exam. That is awesome! Good for you! I have been a registered tour guide for 27 years. I am a serious guide that talks serious history. My period of history that I concentrate the most on is our colonial and revolutionary history - the beginning. I worked for a walking tour company 15 years ago that started the very first freedom and slavery tour. Since then most of the walking tours company that I know do slavery tours. I personally talk about it on every single tour that I give. I have put a lot of study into not only slavery in Charleston, but slavery around the world, including the slavery that continues today. If you check you will see that many tours are talking opening and honestly about slavery. ALL the plantations have either tours on slavery and the enslaved at their plantations. If they have slave cabins, they have opened them to the public and actually have either written information in them or have someone there talking about the lives of slaves. Through Joseph McGills Slave Dwelling Project, Magnolia opened up their cabins so one can spend the night in a slave cabin. Alphonso Brown's Gullah Tours is just one of several tours out there that talk primary about slavery and our slaves contributions to the building of our beautiful city of Charleston. Good luck to you with the exam and your new license!

7 of 7 people like this.
Posted by Sherrie Zabinski on February 15, 2016 at 3:23 PM

Re: “Blondie the horse's accident raises moral questions about the carriage tour industry

Leemajors, not insane. Informed. Which you obviously are not. :D

3 of 4 people like this.
Posted by Sherrie Zabinski on August 3, 2015 at 1:40 AM

Re: “Blondie the horse's accident raises moral questions about the carriage tour industry

Ron - hahaha! Even more clueless. The Market is not a 'slave market' and never has been. The Market area was actually a creek for the longest time. It was part of the land that was owned by the Pinckney family. The Pinckney 'gave' the land to the city for a city market. The land was filled in and the Market was built for meat on the hoof - the Market Hall building has ram's heads and cattle heads in the frieze work of the building representing the fact it is a meat market - vegetables in season, fish, shrimp, bakes goods, baskets, etc. were all sold BY the slaves in the Market. There has NEVER EVER been a slave sold out of the Market. It is in the lease the city signed that the Market must always remain a public Market, if it were to lose that, the land reverts back to the Pinckney family. Slaves were sold all over the city, but mostly on the docks. In the 1850's a law was passed that slaves were to be sold in actual markets. Ryan's auction mart of Chalmers Street is the first 'market' that slaves were sold at. Today that market is known as the Old Slave Mart Museum. The city signed the new 100 year lease not long ago, last few years. Yeah, you know a lot about tourism!

2 of 2 people like this.
Posted by Sherrie Zabinski on August 3, 2015 at 1:39 AM

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