IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD ‌ Betsey Carter on South Battery 

"I grew up here on South Battery, in the very same house I live in today; one of five siblings on the third floor. My family moved into this house in the early 1950s, and my mother still lives here. My husband and I live in the kitchen house out back. Except for one sister in Boston, we all still live here, within several blocks of one another. We started out as the new people on the block. Now my mother is one of the longest-standing residents on the street. A lot of people have come and gone.

"There are a lot of tourists but they are pretty nice. They always want to know about the house, the flowers, or the cats. When the cats were younger, they would be outside in the front yard, wanting to be petted. They're very friendly, very social creatures. But they got old so they're inside most of the time now. They used to be a very popular addition to the street.

"I'm an associate professor of library science at The Citadel. I teach classes for the students on how to do research. I've been there almost 18 years now. That's my day job, at the library. As my friends say, 'mild-mannered librarian by day.' My husband is John Carter. He's also at The Citadel; head of the health exercise and sport science department. We have a daughter, son-in-law, and two granddaughters. They live in Los Angeles.

"My undergraduate degree, from Agnes Scott College in Georgia, is in art. I studied three-dimensional art history, sculpture, and pottery. Then I went on to Emory for my graduate degree in library science. About eight years ago, I started taking classes at the Gibbes Museum School after not doing any clay for years and years. I work primarily in porcelain, making pieces that are both functional and decorative.

"Today, a group of us run Cone 10 Studios at 285 Meeting St. It's named for the temperature we fire the kiln to. There are 20 members of the studio, and five of us who are the partners who run the studio. We have memberships, classes, and our own gallery. It's just an amazing little place with all kinds of good pottery." —as told to Jason A. Zwiker


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