In the Jukebox: the Green and Bold 

A review of the local indie-rock band's new EP

The Green and Bold
Suit Up and Sit Tight

Singer/guitarist Randall Cox brings a new, more intricate dimension to the Green and Bold sound on Suit Up and Sit Tight, a superbly textured, independently released five-song set. Cox and company still draw from the electro-pop/guitar-rock influences that permeated the previous Love, Luck, and Regard sessions, but this time the tunes seem tighter and more energetic, and Cox comes across as more invigorated than ever.

Charleston-based musician, engineer, and producer Josh Kaler (of indie band Slow Runner) carefully helped Cox shape the songs at the Hello Telescope studio. Sonically and instrumentally, the five tracks are more consistent than anything else the project has done to date. It sounds like Cox has learned the value of subtlety, too, using repetition, dramatic dynamics, and varied instrumental intonation for great effect. He and Kaler make clever use of the tambourine, toms, bass synth, shakers, and delay effects, too.

Set to a steady jangle of three electric guitar chords, the opening lines of lead-off song "Black Market" go, "It's official now, I'm bored to tears/Will you be mine for a million years?" The romantic slacker protagonist seems disinterested, but not too indifferent to be in love. That's a running lyrical theme here. Quirky romanticism abounds. Other characters lock arms in Avondale, play piano in the dark, place oranges on their feet, and fantasize about carving their pals into Mt. Rushmore.

"Pajamas" kicks off with a distortion-drenched, Casio-style keys intro and a simple kick/snare pattern before sneaking into one of Cox's tastiest melodic hooks of the collection. "Rosa" is another anthemic, guitar-based rocker. Scratchy-sounding with a basic beat, there's enough charm in Cox's nasal delivery to balance the snarkiness of his lyrics.

Bleepy and crisp with synth drum rhythms, "Italy" and "100 Geniuses" contrast the guitar-based songs, pulsating with a quirky, whispery vibe. Prominent in the mix are big, slappy drum sounds, which help create a unique dance groove. (

The Green and Bold share the stage with the Love Languages at the Tin Roof on Fri. May 20.



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