FR3SH Portrait Battle | Redux Contemporary Art Center | Festivals + Events, City Picks | Charleston City Paper
This is a past event.

FR3SH Portrait Battle 

When: Sat., Jan. 15, 10 a.m.-10 p.m. 2011
Price: Free
www.reduxstudios.org

It’s impossible to determine Charleston’s best artist (though you can pick your favorite with our Best Of voting, hint hint). Everyone has something different to offer. But that doesn’t mean they’re not secretly competitive. Hosted at Redux by the FR3SH Cr3w —Shannon Di, Bennett Goodman, and Joanna Jackson — the FR3SH Portrait Battle will let a group of local artists duke it out for a $500 grand prize and a champion’s belt. The first portrait battle was organized by Max Miller at Eye Level Art in 2009 (back then it was called the Portrait Slam), and Nathan Durfee emerged victorious. He’ll be back to defend his title, but instead of 16 competing artists, now there’s 24 individuals paired up for each bracket. Also different this time around: Instead of the competing pairs painting each other, they’ll be painting models (mostly Lowcountry High Roller girls). Goodman says the best time to catch the action is during the first bracket (at 10 a.m.), since all the artists will still be in the running. Each pair gets two hours to work, and they have free range on what aspect of the models they decide to paint. Goodman doesn’t imagine any big rivalries that may cause a ruckus. “I would hate to even think in that direction,” he laughs. “But I can see where it may be funny for maybe certain people to get paired up. Maybe people that work together or maybe the youngest and the oldest contestant.” The work will be judged by Mark Sloan, director of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, and Robin Berlinsky, director of education at the Children’s Museum of the Lowcountry. “We’re going to have the bracket laid out on the walls,” Goodman says. “After each round, each artist will tell us what they want as far as money wise, and it will go up on the wall and it will be for sale.” He encourages artists and non-artists alike to come out. “We want them to ... be able to come in and see how this art is being created and the skill level that it does take,” Goodman says. “But it is also for all the rest of the community to be able to see the variety of art that can be produced as well, and it’s just going to be really interesting to see it all happen in one single event.” —Susan Cohen

Reviews/comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a review


Roll over stars and click to rate.

Classified Listings

Powered by Foundation   © Copyright 2014, Charleston City Paper   RSS