Dish Dining Guide - Winter 2014
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Welcome to a new installment of Dish. In most issues we often focus on trends, perfectly executed plates, new cocktails, or the performances of first rate chefs. This time, of course, is no different. But there’s another element of our F&B industry we decided to illuminate this time around, especially in light of the late-night debate — the everyday people keeping Charleston’s restaurants afloat. No, not the star chefs you’ve read about time and again. We’re talking about the workaday individuals, prepping, cleaning, greeting, and serving; the unsung heroes of the Holy City’s food scene. And finally, there’s an essay from our own under-appreciated scribe, Robert F. Moss. In this issue Moss bids his years of reviewing adieu. But don’t worry, we’re gonna guilt him into contributing for years to come (whether he likes or not). Enjoy. ­­— Kinsey Gidick

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Unsung Heroes
Unsung Heroes Meet some of the indispensable people keeping the city's restaurants afloat

According to the Charleston Regional Development Alliance, 30,480 people work in the food service industry in Charleston. That's 10.3 percent of the working population cutting, frying, greeting, sweeping, and serving this city's limitless appetite. — Kinsey Gidick


How McCrady's sommelier Cappie Peete's passion for wine led her to mezcal and more
How McCrady's sommelier Cappie Peete's passion for wine led her to mezcal and more In Vino Veritas

As the sommelier of McCrady's, a typical afternoon involves many activities: ordering, stocking, and editing the wine list to start. But my most important task is, of course, choosing the wines to accompany dishes. — Cappie Peete


After seven years of sampling Charleston's finest fare, a critic bids adieu
After seven years of sampling Charleston's finest fare, a critic bids adieu Farewell Reviewing

I've been trying to quit restaurant reviewing for several years now, but, like the mob, it's a surprisingly difficult thing to get out of. Passive aggressive editors keep sneaking your name onto the production schedule, and they devise crafty ruses to keep you on the horse: "Hey, why don't you take the wife to revisit [fancy high-end restaurant with luxurious chocolate desserts]. You could have a date night!" — Robert F. Moss


Mezcal finally gets its day in the sun
Mezcal finally gets its day in the sun Yo Quiero Mezcal

Back in 2013, we talked all things tequila with Gustavo Arellano, the editor of the OC Weekly and the man behind the "¡Ask a Mexican!" syndicated column. A student of Mexican spirits, he was surprised that mezcal — the equivalent of agave moonshine ­— was coming into vogue. — Robert F. Moss


A 30-restaurant trek revealed the city's best fried shrimp spots
A 30-restaurant trek revealed the city's best fried shrimp spots Feeling Fried

It's a scientific fact that within two hours of arrival two out of every three visitors to Charleston will ask, "Where can I get the best bowl of shrimp and grits in town?" That's hardly a surprise, since shrimp and grits is an iconic Lowcountry dish. — Robert F. Moss


Robert Moss' 30 most memorable dishes
Robert Moss' 30 most memorable dishes Food Memories

I sampled plenty of unremarkable dishes during my seven years of reviewing Charleston restaurants, but there were lots of bright spots, too. Here, in no particular order, is my list of the 30 most memorable dishes I ate. — Robert F. Moss


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