Dish Dining Guide - Winter 2014
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Welcome to a new installment of Dish. In most issues we often focus on trends, perfectly executed plates, new cocktails, or the performances of first rate chefs. This time, of course, is no different. But there’s another element of our F&B industry we decided to illuminate this time around, especially in light of the late-night debate — the everyday people keeping Charleston’s restaurants afloat. No, not the star chefs you’ve read about time and again. We’re talking about the workaday individuals, prepping, cleaning, greeting, and serving; the unsung heroes of the Holy City’s food scene. And finally, there’s an essay from our own under-appreciated scribe, Robert F. Moss. In this issue Moss bids his years of reviewing adieu. But don’t worry, we’re gonna guilt him into contributing for years to come (whether he likes or not). Enjoy. ­­— Kinsey Gidick

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Introducing the Dish Top 50
Introducing the Dish Top 50 It's all about the recommendations

This time around, we decided to do something a little different with the Dish dining guide. For years, the guide has been organized by price, starting with Upscale Fine Dining and working its way down to Cheap Eats. — Robert F. Moss


Charleston's collective palate has expanded far and wide
Charleston's collective palate has expanded far and wide Adventures in Dining

About a decade ago, while visiting my in-laws, I went to dinner with the entire extended family at one of those large-format American restaurants with a tri-fold menu offering the full gamut of steaks, ribs, pasta, and seafood. — Robert F. Moss


High Wire's Hat Trick gin starts with fresh ingredients
High Wire's Hat Trick gin starts with fresh ingredients Botanical Spirit

With the opening of three new distilleries in the past few months, Charleston is witnessing the curious phenomenon of locally made spirits merging with a thriving culinary scene. — Robert F. Moss


A whirlwind tour of exotic and ethnic desserts
A whirlwind tour of exotic and ethnic desserts Global sweets, local eats

Turns out Chocolate Thunder from Down Under is not really an indigenous dessert of Australia. And fried ice cream is neither Asian nor Mexican, even though it often pops up on food factory menus of each nationality. — Ric Sommons


All that and a bowl of noodles
All that and a bowl of noodles Noodling Around

Asian noodles swim in a completely different ocean than the durum and semolina flour pastas of Italy. Made from a variety of starches — buckwheat, rice, sweet potato, whole wheat — Asian noodles can be served warmed or chilled, in broth or out. They can even be served with nuts, which is, well, nuts. — Angela Hanyak


David Szlam's philosophy of cheap eats will have you making the best of it
David Szlam's philosophy of cheap eats will have you making the best of it Itinerant Tinkerer

"Is Chris working?" he asks. David Szlam is reared back in a booth, querying the barkeep across the room at Woody's Pizza on the Folly Beach strip. — Jeff Allen


How expensive are expensive tacos anyway?
How expensive are expensive tacos anyway? Taco Trends

The proliferation of taco joints has caused us to examine the price intervals between more than 20 eateries serving the classic Mexican staple. Rather than serving as a quick guide for the cost conscious, this Taco Slider offers some compelling insights into the state of the taco. But first, a note about our methodology. — Angela Hanyak


Self-taught Jeff Butler has fun with food at the 'Wich Doctor
Self-taught Jeff Butler has fun with food at the 'Wich Doctor Edgy and Sometimes Ethnic

When we were asked to write an essay for the Dish issue that would be focusing on ethnic food, I thought, sure, but two things might stand in the way. — Jeff Butler


Beer and food pair better than love and marriage
Beer and food pair better than love and marriage Match Made in Heaven

There's nothing like a big, greasy slice of pizza and a frothy glass of American amber ale. And those hot wings sure do play nicely with that crisp and vivacious pale ale. Fifty pounds of fresh citrus take an already bold IPA to the next level, and short ribs have never been so seductive after a three-hour braise in an espresso-fueled porter. — Eric Doksa


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