Dish Dining Guide - Winter 2014
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Welcome to the latest edition of Dish. This issue is all about the past. In it, we travel back in time to 1999 to see how Charleston’s culinary scene has progressed. And suffice it to say, a lot has changed. From mini bottles to artisanal cocktails, fusion foods to farm-to-table, even the way we talk about what we eat has evolved. But it’s not all gastronomic theory, we stuffed this issue full of hunger-inducing images too. In fact, best grab a bite before you read on. Enjoy. -Kinsey Gidick

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How chefs showcase a distinctive point-of-view on a plate
How chefs showcase a distinctive point-of-view on a plate The Art of Taste

Chefs are composers, and food is their opus. But as with any artist, a chef can experience creative block. Some days, they can write countless recipes. On others, they're stuck. — Susan Cohen


A well-made cocktail's essential ingredient adds depth of flavor
A well-made cocktail's essential ingredient adds depth of flavor The Bitter Truth

"A Manhattan without bitters is like pound cake without vanilla extract or chicken noodle soup without salt and pepper," says Ian Farley, bar manager of West Ashley's the Original Ms. Rose's. "When you forget to add it, you notice." — Erin Holaday Ziegler


Is it time to forego approachability and get back to making masterpieces?
Is it time to forego approachability and get back to making masterpieces? On Chefiness

"Oh, good Lord," my wife said as we left yet another newly opened restaurant, full but unsatisfied. "We should have just stayed home and cooked." — Robert F. Moss


Chicken and waffles strike a perfect balance
Chicken and waffles strike a perfect balance Sweet and Savory

Brunch in Charleston got real about eight years ago when a big dish called chicken and waffles showed up. Back in the day, I spent an alarming amount of time at A.C.'s Bar and Grill and was convinced that they had invented this strangely good combination. Fried chicken, fluffy waffles, sticky syrup — the ingredients were simple, but the combination was sublime. — Kelly Rae Smith


Exploring the ACE Basin's oyster bounty with St. Jude Farms
Exploring the ACE Basin's oyster bounty with St. Jude Farms The Briny Wild

The way is narrow and shallow into Fish Creek, a remote bend in the ACE Basin where Taylor Sikes goes to check on his oysters. Hooking a right off the South Edisto River, Sikes guns the flatboat as he enters the nearly hidden creek, fully aware that he has about a foot of clearance underneath. — Paul Bowers


Pickles are the new pork fat
Pickles are the new pork fat Pucker Up

For years the American palate has led a rather undistinguished search for the sour. In modern times — since the advent of deep freeze refrigeration, vacuum packaging, and a supply chain that provides the same bevy of vegetables regardless of weather or season — our idea of a pickle has barely moved beyond the drab medallions that inhabit the upper layer of a Big Mac. — Jeff Allen


Forget that sticky kid stuff, proper sweetness is key to grown-up drinks
Forget that sticky kid stuff, proper sweetness is key to grown-up drinks Simple Sugar

I had just sat down at one of those generic hotel bars in a city on the East Coast — they all sort of run together after a while — when it struck me that something was missing. At first I thought it was the lack of interesting booze on the bar shelves: a handful of decent bourbons and scotches, a few premium vodkas, but no rye whiskey or any interesting liqueurs beyond a wayward bottle of Campari. — Robert F. Moss


Harnessing umami, the most complex taste we can sense with our tongues
Harnessing umami, the most complex taste we can sense with our tongues Magically Delicious

Can you imagine eating a french fry without ketchup? What does ketchup taste like anyway? It's a little sweet and a bit salty, but it's also something else, something deeper and more satisfying. That hard-to-identify taste actually has a name — umami. — Stephanie Barna


The chef and owner of Two Boroughs Larder makes every minute count
The chef and owner of Two Boroughs Larder makes every minute count Pursuing Perfection

It's been exactly 545 days since my wife Heather and I opened our restaurant, Two Boroughs Larder. Since that day, I have counted every single minute of every hour in every one of those days. I am constantly wishing that there was simply more time, that if I just had a few more hours I could get caught up. I could get ahead of this game. Hell, I could even get some sleep. — Josh Keeler


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