When it comes to food, Charleston is riding a wave of prosperity
When it comes to food, Charleston is riding a wave of prosperity Taste Sensation

I began writing about food for the Charleston City Paper three years ago with a contribution to the Winter 2008 installment of Dish. Looking back at that issue, it now seems like I hopped aboard the train at just the right time. — Robert Moss


Southern food finds hungry sympathizers in New York City
Southern food finds hungry sympathizers in New York City Empire State South

The biscuit gleams. A solid spoonful of butter rests precariously at the edge of a slab of chicken and doughy bread, its artery-coating goodness disintegrating unabashedly onto the plate. — Stratton Lawrence


Local chefs are pickling vegetables and using them to brighten wintry dishes
Local chefs are pickling vegetables and using them to brighten wintry dishes Pickle Power

Charleston chefs are harnessing the power of pickles this winter, bringing bright flavor to all kinds of dishes from the humblest barbecue to the most elegant charcuterie. After I sampled a few around town it was clear why. A good pickle can be a versatile and potent deliverer of taste (sweet, salty, bitter, sour, and umami) and flavor (dill, mustard, fennel, coriander, and many more), and they can come in a range of heats and textures. Some are spicy, some sweet, some tender, and some crisp, and all can be tweaked according to the chef's whim and accompanying menu. — Brys Stephens


Crafting sushi for the deep-fried Southern palate
Crafting sushi for the deep-fried Southern palate Rolled in the South

When you're aiming to please the Charleston sushi customer, there are four ingredients necessary: cream cheese, mayonnaise, tempura flakes, and sweet glaze. So when it came time to design a signature roll for his restaurant, Wasabi on Daniel Island, Chef Johnny Chan opted not to use any of them. — Stratton Lawrence


A farm-to-table story starring Oak Steakhouse and Yon Family Farms
A farm-to-table story starring Oak Steakhouse and Yon Family Farms Cattle Call

Let's get one thing straight. There are many different quality grades when it comes to beef — and less than 1.5 percent earns the label Certified Angus Beef brand Prime. So when Steve Palmer, managing partner of the Indigo Road group, which owns Oak and O-Ku, asks us to go on a road trip to visit where these kind of cows are raised, we say yes. Right away. — Alison Sher


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