Chefs champion tangy kimchi, the classic condiment of Korean cuisine
Chefs champion tangy kimchi, the classic condiment of Korean cuisine A Korean Knockout

To say that kimchi packs a punch is an understatement. It possesses a crunch rivaled only by the best pickles. If its spicy kick doesn't knock you out of your flip-flops, then its sourness, the product of days, if not weeks of fermentation, certainly will. But if that doesn't get you, the smell of garlic and fish sauce and onions and who knows what else will surely do the trick. — Chris Haire


Veggie man Jay Maynard connects chefs with local, seasonal fare
Veggie man Jay Maynard connects chefs with local, seasonal fare Farm to Kitchen

"You'll have to excuse my truck," says produce broker Jay Maynard as I park my car on East Bay Street and climb into his. "It's a dirty, beat-up old farm truck." The outside of the truck is covered in dust from trips down dry dirt roads out at Thackeray Farms on Wadmalaw Island, and the inside is well worn. I'm spending the day with Maynard to see firsthand how the best quality produce from local and regional farms gets to Charleston chefs and their tables. — Brys Stephens


Late summer means it's time to boil up a fresh supper
Late summer means it's time to boil up a fresh supper A Frogmore Feast

Across the marsh, beyond the silhouettes of two shrimp boats pulled to the dock, the sun hovers over the horizon — reluctant, it seems, to put an end to this idyllic summer day. — Stratton Lawrence


Food trucks dish up good food with a good attitude
Food trucks dish up good food with a good attitude Hello World

The culinary scene is driving in a new direction, and not just in Charleston. Treated to a never-ending stream of rodeos and roving food parties, the nation's hipsters can't get enough rotis, barbecue sandwiches, gourmet donuts, and Korean tacos, from L.A. to Brooklyn. People are willing to forgo cloth napkins and uniformed servers for improvised outdoor food courts and even, in the case of Hello My Name is BBQ, picnic tables at a West Ashley scooter shop. — Susan Cohen


Hunting down food trucks has become a popular sport
Hunting down food trucks has become a popular sport On the Move

There's an art to finding food trucks, and it usually involves Facebook, Twitter, and a willingness to drop everything and head to the latest rodeo. The Charleston Food Truck Federation is a loose collection of trucks that includes Roti Rolls, Geechee Island Mobile Kitchen, Little Blue Brunch Truck, Happy Camper Snoballs, Pot Kettle Black, and Tokyo Crepes. More trucks seem to pop up every day, and we even have a few carts that you might include in the mix. Keep an eye out for them at Eat Street (a parking lot off of Morris and Coming streets), at a rodeo, or wherever else a social media outlet might lead you. — Susan Cohen


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