Is it fall yet? After living in the Lowcountry for over a decade, the belated arrival of autumn still gets me. Gourds sit on porches, rotting before our eyes. The pumpkin spice squad chokes down the flavored lattes while sweating in their cars. Then again, part of the beauty of the Lowcountry’s relucant-to-leave summer is our extended growing season. We nosh on tomatoes and watermelons for ages it seems. But I’m ready to trade my peaches for pecans, my sweet corn for sweet potatoes. With any luck this hot weather will turn and we’ll get to indulge in fall’s best.

I’ve got my eye on Molly & Me’s pralines thanks to our Dirt feature on the company. Then there’s the upcoming October 23 Blood on the River event that’s what I imagine our hunting and gathering ancestors did this time of year. Dozens of chefs and farmers will gather on Wadmalaw to learn traditional Cajun butchering styles, slaughter dozens of animals, then have a feast. If that’s not a harvest party, I don’t know what is. —Kinsey Gidick

Lowcountry Farms

Kay Holseberg keeps the Lowcountry's pecan farming tradition alive on her 150 acres
Kay Holseberg keeps the Lowcountry's pecan farming tradition alive on her 150 acres A Pecan-Do Attitude

For years, the namesake of Molly & Me pecans could be found nestled beneath the towering pecan trees of Kay Holseberg's farm in Holly Hill, South Carolina. Laying comfortably and, most likely, snacking on a few of the passed over nuts from her owner's morning picks, Molly, a presa canario mastiff, was Holseberg's business partner — her daily companion as she spent hours picking up pecans from the trees. — Claire Volkman


Blood on the River returns for the third Lowcountry Boucherie
Blood on the River returns for the third Lowcountry Boucherie Meat in the Flesh

When I arrive at the hidden farm tucked down a dirt road on Wadmawlaw, there's still mist coming off Bohicket Creek. But even at this early hour, the farm is a whirl of activity. — Kinsey Gidick


Forget world peas, broccoli could be our saving grace
Forget world peas, broccoli could be our saving grace Green Giant

Can broccoli save the world? That may be a bit ambitious, but if Mark Farnham, Ph.D., has his way, the cabbage's humble green cousin will at least greatly shrink the country's carbon footprint. — Helen Mitternight


What can we learn from Dorchester County's bee-killing pesticide debacle?
What can we learn from Dorchester County's bee-killing pesticide debacle? Buzz Kill

When 2.3 million of Juanita Stanley's honeybees were killed by a pesticide spray in August, her business was not the only thing she had to worry about. Ten Lowcountry farms — most in Dorchester County — were lined up to use her bees as pollinators next spring. — Amanda Coyne


What's the right choice in the great food debate?
What's the right choice in the great food debate? Local Versus Organic

Forget foreign cars and name brand jeans, today you're more likely to be judged by what's on your dinner table than where you bought your pants. Is that steak local, grass-fed, animal welfare approved? Did you pair it with a side of local, organic, heirloom potatoes? — Nikki Seibert Kelley


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