Digital broadcast switchover, Casting call, Music Execs Target Brits, Scrabulous 

Freeze Frame

Digital Guinea Pig

On Sept. 8, Wilmington, N.C., became the first market to end analog transmissions and broadcast exclusively in digital, according to the Associated Press. The move is well in advance of the national digital shift on Feb. 17. More than 28,000 government-issued coupons for digital converter boxes have already been redeemed while over 69,000 coupons have been requested. According to The Nielsen Company, Wilmington is the 135th largest television market in the U.S. with about 180,000 households. —Myles Hutto

Tear-jerker Seeks Extras

There will be a casting call Sept. 20 for the movie adaptation of Nicholas Sparks' Dear John. It stars Amanda Seyfried (Mamma Mia!, Mean Girls) as a college student who falls in love with a soldier, and will be filmed in the Charleston area. Dear John is currently in pre-production. Extras of all types and all ages are needed. Those interested must bring a snapshot. Casting lasts from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at Trident Technical College, Building 410, 7000 Rivers Ave.—Kelly Stroup

Music Execs Target Brits

British lawyers for entertainment companies are pursuing thousands of people suspected of illegally sharing copyrighted media, the Associated Press reports. Britain's six largest internet providers have released names and IP addresses and are set to send file-sharers letters warning them of their violation of copyright laws. The number of people may reach 25,000. An estimated 6 million Britons download music illegally. Online piracy reportedly causes millions in losses for record companies, film studios, and game makers. —Myles Hutto

Poor Scrabulous

Facebook has decided to avoid a copyright battle over its popular game, Scrabulous, the AP reports. Following a formal removal request by Mattel Inc., the owner of Scrabble, Facebook decided to pull Scrabulous. It's still available in India, the home of Scrabulous inventors Jayant and Rajat Agarwalla. Mattel continues to try to promote its own authorized version of Scrabble for Facebook. Despite Facebook's actions, ownership will be decided in an Indian court. —Myles Hutto


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