jrlamb 
Member since Sep 8, 2008


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Recent Comments

Re: “Deregulation will only lead us to disaster

I think a great example of effective regulation is that from the FAA and NTSB of the commercial airline industry. Isn't it absolutely remarkable that with tens of thousands of domestic flights every day that there hasn't been a single fatality on a commercial flight in more than four years? We can manage to hurtle millions of these incredibly complex machines through the air at nearly 500 mph and yet not a single person dies in four years? The feat is almost entirely thanks to our government having meticulously examined every single incident involving commercial aircraft since the beginning of modern air travel. Imagine how expensive these sorts of investigations are. They involve hundreds or thousands of experts and often many years to conclude. We pay for these with tax dollars because they contribute to the public good. But upon concluding the cause of an accident, what's the next step?

Do you like the idea of flying on a plane that crashed last year due to a mechanical problem that still hasn't been fixed? If it was simply left up to the private industry to do what they want with the information, they would likely do a cost-benefit analysis to see whether they want to immediately fix the issue or maybe wait until the next maintenance cycle for their planes. Some companies may choose to ignore the information entirely. Just too expensive to fix it...worth the risk. Every time you fly, if you want to maximize your chances at survival, you'd have to research which airlines followed a good maintenance schedule before deciding on a carrier. Where would you find the maintenance records for each carrier? They of course wouldn't publicize them. The natural solution is for the federal government to create a regulation that requires all commercial air carriers fix the problem within a reasonable amount of time. There are now thousands and thousands of rules that regulate the behavior of air carriers. These are why we are blessed with the privilege of flying across this great country in less than six hours without even thinking twice about whether we're going to be in one piece upon arrival.

3 of 4 people like this.
Posted by jrlamb on May 12, 2013 at 1:29 PM

Re: “Will Moredock says goodbye to the City Paper

You've done an outstanding job as the rational, liberal voice in this conservative area. I've learned so much SC history from your columns. I've especially appreciated the historical context you provide when discussing the current political climate. When the past is considered, the hypocrisy becomes overwhelmingly obvious. Thank you for your service!

9 of 14 people like this.
Posted by jrlamb on August 17, 2012 at 12:53 AM

Re: “Will Moredock says goodbye to the City Paper

Will,
You've done an outstanding job as the rational, liberal voice in this conservative area. I've learned so much SC history from your columns. I've especially appreciated the historical context you provide when discussing the current political climate. When the past is considered, the hypocrisy becomes overwhelmingly obvious. Thank you for your service!

11 of 15 people like this.
Posted by jrlamb on August 17, 2012 at 12:52 AM

Re: “Downtown thermometer for carriage horses could be relocated

I think there are some serious measurement errors being made here. What's this about following a carriage around with a wall-mount thermometer? Was it in the sun the whole time? Ambient air temperature is measured in the shade via a fan-ventilated cover to ensure the temperature of the air itself is being sampled, not the radiant energy from the sun. I'm wondering if the uber expensive new sensor being installed by Rees Scientific will be properly shielded from the sun? If not, it's going to give exorbitantly high readings that are not meteorologically sound. I understand that they want the temperature to be measured above the asphalt where the horses are working. That makes sense, and the temperature at observation height 2 meters above the surface will likely be a couple degrees warmer than the rooftop temperature at the Sustainability Institute. But the horses go all over downtown, so to be fair, they should install a couple sensors at various places around the carriage tour circuit and average the temperatures to compare against the 98 degrees threshold.

0 of 1 people like this.
Posted by jrlamb on July 31, 2011 at 11:05 PM

Re: “Reading the Tea Leaves on Tax Day

Amen, brother Moredock!

Posted by jrlamb on May 31, 2009 at 9:01 AM

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