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Re: “Motorcycles have become a nuisance in Charleston

MOTORCYCLE NOISE SHOULD BE INVESTIGATED AT A NATIONAL LEVEL
The persecuted biker myth was well established among dealers, clubs, and magazines by 1903. Rather than face those whose business they interrupted with noise, biker groups employed PR on the public front and back-channel lobbying on the legislative—they’ve been at it ever since. Recently, the Congressional Quarterly noted ”the political muscle motorcyclists enjoy…strength of rider organizations…to mobilize…on statehouse steps in a phalanx of wheels, loud mufflers...state groups are organized with military precision and employ sophisticated political tactics.”
Many folks can’t open a window on a nice day or enjoy conversation because of roaring Harleys. Why must they cede the sanctity of their homes to noisemakers? When a child turns away from her studies as a Harley rumbles by, time of her life is taken away—forever. Is this fair?
For decades Bikers’ Rights groups and the industry that empowers them have avoided public deliberation by which claims of rights must be vetted in free societies. It time they come out of the closet.
PS: Forgive me for posting the same information twice.

Posted by iluvatar on August 24, 2008 at 8:40 AM

Re: “Motorcycles have become a nuisance in Charleston

LIBERTY & “OUTLAW BRAND” MARKETING
"It's not hardware; it is a lifestyle, an emotional attachment. That's what we have to keep marketing to." --Richard F. Teerlink, Harley's chairman and former chief executive.
‘...Harley-Davidson was on its way to the suburbs, where the thunder would reach ear-shattering levels.’ --Brock Yates, Outlaw Machine.
“Harley-Davidson is an American icon—but, paradoxically, one that captures the Outlaw rather than the heroic character of American life.” [THE HERO AND THE OUTLAW: Building Extraordinary Brands Through the Power of Archetypes. Margaret Mark & Carol S. Pearson]
By the late 1970s Harley-Davidson, unable to compete with superior Japanese and European motorcycles, had been near bankruptcy for some time. In 1982, just after the EPA Noise Office (ONAC) was stripped of its funding, Harley begged for and received a federal bailout. [Uneasy Rider: Harley pleads for relief. TIME Economy & Business, Dec. 13, 1982.] In a 1986 IPO, Vaughn Beals, then Harley's chief executive, and a dozen other company officers who found outside financing, acquired the lion’s share of the company’s stock. Harley kept the old-fashioned engine design for the noise it produced. (The company even applied for patent protection of the Harley engine noise. [The Trademark Registrability of the Harley-Davidson Roar: A Multimedia Analysis Michael B. Sapherstein http://www.bc.edu/bc_org/avp/law/st_org/iptf/articles/content/1998101101.html ]) Harley-Davidson’s new strategy not to advertise the mechanical quality of its product but to market the Harley as the centerpiece of an outlaw biker lifestyle—the lifestyle image of what the American Motorcyclists Association (attempting to assure citizens that 99 percent of its members were law-abiding citizens) denounced as the "1 percent" of bikers who gave motorcycling a bad name.
“The company embraced the one per centers [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Motorcycle_club#One_Percenters] and reframed their destructive tendencies as a guide to what their most hardcore and loyal customers wanted. As a result, the company's fortunes were reversed and its value soared… Hells Angels as lead-users - what a great notion." [ Modern Marketing Blog's January 16, 2006 "Why Hells Angels Know Best", by James Cherkoff.] Harley-Davidson went so far as to market the antisocial tribal identity of the Hells Angels to suburbanites as patriotic virtue! Automotive journalist Brock Yates put it this way: “At the very core were the Hells Angels, the ultimate outsiders and the truly anointed…Harley-Davidson masterfully mixed the bad-guy image of the biker gangs with the independent, free-thinking, patriotic American cowboy… totally loyal to the nation’s core traditions.” [OUTLAW MACHINE: Brock Yates, p. 157] News media went along for the ride and printed Harley PR as journalism: They’re nice folks: "doctors, lawyers, policemen, business owners" who love “the booming sound and patriotic fury [that] Harley thunders.” Of course they’re nice folks, but demanding other folks’ attention isn’t nice or patriotic; it’s rude.
“The flag should never be used for advertising purposes in any manner whatsoever.”
--United States Code: Title 4, Chapter 1.

Posted by iluvatar on August 24, 2008 at 8:34 AM

Re: “Motorcycles have become a nuisance in Charleston

LIBERTY & “OUTLAW BRAND” MARKETING
"It's not hardware; it is a lifestyle, an emotional attachment. That's what we have to keep marketing to." --Richard F. Teerlink, Harley's chairman and former chief executive.
‘...Harley-Davidson was on its way to the suburbs, where the thunder would reach ear-shattering levels.’ --Brock Yates, Outlaw Machine.
“Harley-Davidson is an American icon—but, paradoxically, one that captures the Outlaw rather than the heroic character of American life.” [THE HERO AND THE OUTLAW: Building Extraordinary Brands Through the Power of Archetypes. Margaret Mark & Carol S. Pearson]
By the late 1970s Harley-Davidson, unable to compete with superior Japanese and European motorcycles, had been near bankruptcy for some time. In 1982, just after ONAC was stripped of its funding, Harley begged for and received a federal bailout. [Uneasy Rider: Harley pleads for relief. TIME Economy & Business, Dec. 13, 1982.] In a 1986 IPO, Vaughn Beals, then Harley's chief executive, and a dozen other company officers who found outside financing, acquired the lion’s share of the company’s stock. Harley kept the old-fashioned engine design for the noise it produced. (The company even applied for patent protection of the Harley engine noise. [The Trademark Registrability of the Harley-Davidson Roar: A Multimedia Analysis Michael B. Sapherstein http://www.bc.edu/bc_org/avp/law/st_org/iptf/articles/content/1998101101.html ]) Harley-Davidson’s new strategy not to advertise the mechanical quality of its product but to market the Harley as the centerpiece of an outlaw biker lifestyle—the lifestyle image of what the American Motorcyclists Association (attempting to assure citizens that 99 percent of its members were law-abiding citizens) denounced as the "1 percent" of bikers who gave motorcycling a bad name.
“The company embraced the one per centers [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Motorcycle_club#One_Percenters] and reframed their destructive tendencies as a guide to what their most hardcore and loyal customers wanted. As a result, the company's fortunes were reversed and its value soared… Hells Angels as lead-users - what a great notion." [ Modern Marketing Blog's January 16, 2006 "Why Hells Angels Know Best", by James Cherkoff.] Harley-Davidson went so far as to market the antisocial tribal identity of the Hells Angels to suburbanites as patriotic virtue! Automotive journalist Brock Yates put it this way: “At the very core were the Hells Angels, the ultimate outsiders and the truly anointed…Harley-Davidson masterfully mixed the bad-guy image of the biker gangs with the independent, free-thinking, patriotic American cowboy… totally loyal to the nation’s core traditions.” [OUTLAW MACHINE: Brock Yates, p. 157] News media including the Richmond Times-Dispatch went along for the ride and printed Harley PR as journalism: They’re nice folks: "doctors, lawyers, policemen, business owners" who love “the booming sound and patriotic fury [that] Harley thunders.” Of course they’re nice folks, but demanding other folks’ attention isn’t nice or patriotic; it’s rude.
“The flag should never be used for advertising purposes in any manner whatsoever.”
--United States Code: Title 4, Chapter 1.

Posted by iluvatar on August 24, 2008 at 8:23 AM

Re: “Motorcycles have become a nuisance in Charleston

“UNCONSTITUTIONAL AND DISCRIMINATORY LAWS AGAINST MOTORCYCLISTS”
The American Motorcyclists Association’s (AMA) response to the environmental reforms of the 60s was “the formation of the AMA's Legislative Department, with a mission to ". . .coordinate national legal activity against unconstitutional and discriminatory laws against motorcyclists, to serve as a sentinel on federal and state legislation affecting motorcyclists, and to be instrumental as a lobbying force for motorcyclists and motorcycling interests. ''http://www.amadirectlink.com/whatis/history.asp A Motorcycle Riders Foundation (MRF) http://www.mrf.org/ paper reveals the collusion between motorcycle consumer-enthusiasts and the industry: “Reducing noise would require new research and development, and would…affect sales. We should be able to rely on the industry for technical information to combat such regulations [and] they…on us for grassroots activism...”
Like the American air transportation industry, U.S. motorcycle businesses demonstrate an unhealthy fear of meeting the challenge of superior EU standards. The National Coalition of Motorcyclists refers to these standards as “the EUROPEAN THREAT…threats such as…noise limits.” The American motorcycle industry has organized consumers through motorcycle rights organizations to “work with allies in Europe to influence talks on vehicle globalization” [A HISTORY OF BIKERS RIGHTS IN AMERICA: As Seen By Bill Bish; http://www.bikernet.com/news/specials/rightshistory.asp ]

Posted by iluvatar on August 24, 2008 at 8:19 AM

Re: “Motorcycles have become a nuisance in Charleston

In the past, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) coordinated all federal noise control activities through its Office of Noise Abatement and Control (ONAC). From 1972 to 1981 ONAC aided states in developing effective noise control programs, provided funds for noise research, and produced public educational materials on the harmful effects of noise and ways to control it. Faced with strong industry opposition, ONAC lost its funding in 1981 [just as ONAC was preparing to establish noise standards for transportation sources] and the EPA's programs to control noise were halted. Federal oversight of transportation noise is now filled by agencies whose core mandates are often at odds with quiet communities. Dr. Arline Bronzaft noted that “By relying on methods that underestimate the numbers of people affected by airport-related noises and dismissing the growing evidence that aviation noise is harmful to health, quality of life and children’s development, United States aviation transportation policies largely ignore the impacts of airport-related noises on residents.” The motorcycle industry benefits from the same old fashioned federal noise policies. The bottom line is that current U.S. noise policy regulates peoples’ lives, and the sanctity of their homes on behalf of irresponsible industries—citizens subsidize these moneyed corporations in the currency of diminished quality of life. [http://www.areco.org/US%20denies%20noise%20harm.pdf
The Noise Control Act and the Quiet Communities Act were not rescinded by Congress and remain in effect today, although essentially unfunded. The President of the United States could revitalize the Noise Control Act and the Quiet Communities Act by executive order, and make good again the Federal government’s promise to "promote an environment for all Americans free from noise that jeopardizes health or welfare."
EPA HISTORY PAGE: NOISE CONTROL ACT, 1972: http://www.epa.gov/history/topics/nca/index.htm
H.R. 2895 [109th]: Quiet Communities Act of 2005 “To reestablish the Office of Noise Abatement and Control in the Environmental Protection Agency…”
Introduced: Jun 14, 2005. Status: Dead http://www.govtrack.us/congress/billtext.xpd?bill=h109-2895

Posted by iluvatar on August 24, 2008 at 8:16 AM
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