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Comment Archives: Stories: Spoleto 2012

Re: “David Lee Nelson's Elephant in My Closet is earnest and bittersweet

So, I'll like it politically, but is it good theater?

I can get the political affirmation from any number of friends, online chats, or Facebook groups without paying admission. I expect a bit more from an entertainment venue.

Posted by Booklady1 on May 23, 2014 at 9:33 PM

Re: “Downtown blues staple returns after a self-imposed hiatus

I saw this band in 2000 on John Street...Was Great...Hope 2 c them again soon Frank and Marilyn Black Clinton Illinois

Posted by Delta Frank Black on March 14, 2014 at 4:58 PM

Re: “Virginia Rodrigues hypnotizes her audience with stripped-down bossa nova

"Rodrigues hails from Santiago, the capital city of Brazil's heavily Afro-influenced Bahia state."

Rodrigues hails of Salvador city, the capital of state of Bahia in Brazil.

Sean A. Carter: If you do not know what you're talking about, please shut up for the sake of humanity.

2 of 2 people like this.
Posted by Tupã Aruanã on June 23, 2013 at 11:01 PM

Re: “Virginia Rodrigues hypnotizes her audience with stripped-down bossa nova

Friend Sean A. Carter, you certainly do not know anything about Brazilian popular music, much less the spiritual interpretation of the Great Diva Virginia and his herald Mosque. Music Afro Bahia is a uniqueness that can not be found anywhere on the planet and not play as well as who is here this Blessed Land and truly knows the african rhythms from Bahia Brazil. As they say here: "You can not truly understand Bahianity People's Baiano, if you are not a"

Virginia is Diva, a beautiful story, Warrior Woman, Black Women, Women of Candomblé, Woman of Bahia.

As for Jazz? Friend us Brazilians and Bahia we have our own style of making music. If you do not understand, do not talk nonsense.

good night

2 of 2 people like this.
Posted by Tupã Aruanã on June 23, 2013 at 8:31 PM

Re: “Miles and Coltrane: Blue(.) will get in your veins

Fantastic review Ms. Lewis! You, as usual, hit the nail on the head, describing the darkness of Davis's soul driving his expression, in contradistinction to Coltrane's core belief that the saxophone and his ability to play it were divine gifts, allowing him the therapeutic liberty of expression ...

1 of 1 people like this.
Posted by George J. Gatgounis on June 29, 2012 at 1:31 PM

Re: “Rebirth lets the good times roll at the Cistern

Yeah, it was a wild party Friday night at the Cistern. The tight-assed "ushers" weren't just up front. They were on a mission it seemed to stop people from having a good time. One was running around telling people not to take photos. What a hoot it was when Stafford Agee whipped out his iPhone and started taking pictures of the audience of having a great time! The band was hot! I'd seen them in NOLA more than a few years ago. And I think they were better than before. If you missed 'em, you missed a great party. There were plenty of seats among the trees. I was pretty amused when I got there and saw so much blue hair in the audience. I guess they thought they were going to Preservation Hall. Ha! Were they in for a surprise. They started leaving after about 20 minutes. I guess it wasn't their "cup of tea".

1 of 2 people like this.
Posted by Brian Beach on June 11, 2012 at 3:55 PM

Re: “Monologist Mike Daisey's painful odyssey through the new media machine

The very last words I have to say on this subject, hopefully until the end of time.
http://www.manandultraman.com/archives/872

Posted by PatrickS on June 11, 2012 at 5:12 AM

Re: “Mike Daisey is just as disappointed with himself as you want him to be

I was at the show and was thoroughly disappointed. Definitely not worth the 35$ i paid for the ticket. What I also found rather humorous was the fact that he never explicitly mentions what he did wrong in regards to his 'scandal'. I know there were some audience members who bought a ticket not knowing much (or anything) about Mike Daisey and then spent 2 hours listening to him drone on about whatever he did wrong, not knowing what in gods name he was talking about. Indeed, even I, knowing the ins and outs of the scandal, got sick of hearing about his sob story. I was looking forward to hearing about teching in India and instead got this barely coherent monologue. Mike Daisey, if you want people to forget about your scandal then stop talking about it.

2 of 4 people like this.
Posted by droctagon on June 8, 2012 at 10:59 AM

Re: “Mike Daisey is just as disappointed with himself as you want him to be

First of all, Sweetie, Ira is a him not a her. (Bless your little heart)
Second, and more important, you're being scammed and enjoying it. Daisey was a bush-league journalist/entertainer until he got caught with his hand in the journalistic cookie jar. His show of remorse? He's apologizing all the way to the bank! Since he scammed APR he's made more money for notoriety and apologies than he has in his entire career up to that point, so you see he's not going to drop the apologies until suckers like you stop paying to hear them. (Bless your little heart!) Isn't that obvious Dusty?

1 of 7 people like this.
Posted by Ima Oldman on June 8, 2012 at 7:16 AM

Re: “Mike Daisey is just as disappointed with himself as you want him to be

The show definitely felt like a work in progress, raw and over-long, but was fascinating for that reason. It will never be seen again in this form. He kept talking of getting older, but he is still making the young man's error of letting others define him. I kept wishing he would drop the apologies. As a master story-teller, he has to know that it is as easy to tell the truth with fiction as to lie with facts. He should have never let Ira Glass dump her guilt onto him. He's a smart man, and I think he will eventually gain the confidence in his art that comes with maturity.

4 of 5 people like this.
Posted by obviousdusty on June 7, 2012 at 9:36 PM

Re: “Boston Marriage needs counseling

This cleverly titled review of "Boston Marriage" is fair and constructive. Too often, local reviewers uncritically praise productions playing in town. But we need reviews that point out flaws as well as highlights. This review is a good example of the kind that local [and visiting] patrons find useful and enlightening.

Posted by GGG on June 7, 2012 at 8:39 PM

Re: “Monologist Mike Daisey's painful odyssey through the new media machine

My thoughts exactly, Mat.

"The problem is and always was that he allowed the media to present his show as fact. Neither Shakespeare nor David Lynch went before the media, repeatedly, and allowed the media to purport that the material presented in their theatrical works was the literal truth.

Daisey did that. He did exactly that. There isn't any analogy you could possibly conceive of that explains that away or makes it right. I cannot quite understand why you are going to such lengths to absolve Daisey, or how you are trying to tie this to the demise of "Capital-J Journalism".

The standard of "art" in taking literal truths and altering them to present a narrative in a cohesive and entertaining manner is unquestioned. Trying to pretend that Daisey is blameless because of this standard is indefensible."

Posted by arteear01 on June 7, 2012 at 4:29 PM

Re: “Monologist Mike Daisey's painful odyssey through the new media machine

Patrick,

Your "profile of Daisey as an artist" and not as a journalist fails because you are indeed viewing him through the media lens that he placed himself under. Your piece assaults the media for all of the wrong reasons and ultimately allows Daisey to get away clean for his "tragic flaw". Perhaps if you had focused more on the long-running traditions in which art has tried to express true stories without sticking to literal truth (as you have now in this most recent comment), you would have succeeded in defending Daisey's right to embellish or augment his story with dramatic touches instead of sticking to the literal story of his trip to China.

Instead, you've traveled a different road in your column, trying to apply the standard of the artist to one who did not stick steadfastly to that concept but instead allowed his art to be presented directly as truth on numerous occasions and in numerous venues.

Should Daisey be allowed to go on performing his art? Sure. He can even leave in all the specious bits, if he wants to. There's really no question about that. In fact, there never was a question about that.

The problem is and always was that he allowed the media to present his show as fact. Neither Shakespeare nor David Lynch went before the media, repeatedly, and allowed the media to purport that the material presented in their theatrical works was the literal truth.

Daisey did that. He did exactly that. There isn't any analogy you could possibly conceive of that explains that away or makes it right. I cannot quite understand why you are going to such lengths to absolve Daisey, or how you are trying to tie this to the demise of "Capital-J Journalism".

The standard of "art" in taking literal truths and altering them to present a narrative in a cohesive and entertaining manner is unquestioned. Trying to pretend that Daisey is blameless because of this standard is indefensible.

Posted by mat catastrophe on June 6, 2012 at 4:46 PM

Re: “Monologist Mike Daisey's painful odyssey through the new media machine

Hi Mat. You hit the nail on the head when you say Daisey's piece is theater and not journalism. The very point of theater is to "make up key details of a story to present a piece of dramatic theater." This is what theater has been from its beginning. Nobody's objecting that Shakespeare deliberately made up key details about the reign of Henry the IV in order to present a piece of dramatic theater. Nobody's pulling out their hair because 'The Elephant Man' took dramatic liberties with the real life of John Merrick. Did Daisey inflate elements of his China experience for the same reasons? Obviously, yes, because that's what drama is. He is here at Spoleto performing theater, not performing journalism. He has repeatedly acknowledged the mistake he made by appearing on TAL (again at this festival). My point is let's allow the man to do theater, which he's good at, and to stay well away from journalism, which he's not good at.

I didn't say I teach journalism in Vietnam. I said I earned an M.A. in journalism. At RMIT's Centre for Communication and Design, I teach mass communications, e.g. media and society, communication theory, cultural studies, and Asian cybercultures. Regarding the lack of a free press and one whose function is to merely produce propaganda, the more time I spend outside the U.S. looking in, the more unclear it is to me which system prevails here. As Ballard (and Noam Chomsky) have noted, mainstream news outlets in the West serve up just as much propaganda as you'll find in any authoritarian state. But here it's driven not by government directive but by advertiser influence, the status quo, the fear of political flak, and the never-ending hunger for profit. Different models, same outcome.

Posted by PatrickS on June 6, 2012 at 12:00 PM

Re: “Monologist Mike Daisey's painful odyssey through the new media machine

The clowns at the cable news networks (and their lawyers) would be quick to point out that you're confusing "news" and "opinion". The news they present is accurate, if highly biased. As much as I love you, Ballard, you're not only missing the point but you're providing misdirection, too. Not helpful.

1 of 2 people like this.
Posted by arteear01 on June 6, 2012 at 9:54 AM

Re: “This year's Spoleto festival is built on memory, truth, and lies

The statement "his fable led the New York Times and other news outlets to investigate the matter" is not true.

"In fact, the New York Times has been reporting on Foxconn since 2006; and in 2010, the newspaper published more than a dozen stories addressing a rash of suicides at the Foxconn factory, which manufactures Sony and Dell products in addition to ubiquitous Apple devices like the iPhone and iPad."

http://www.ibtimes.com/articles/347023/201…

1 of 1 people like this.
Posted by arteear01 on June 6, 2012 at 9:32 AM

Re: “Monologist Mike Daisey's painful odyssey through the new media machine

Re: "I know of no journalistic standard that says that is OK to simply make something up because it helps prove a point..." — Tell that to the clowns at the cable news networks.

1 of 1 people like this.
Posted by TBLesemann on June 6, 2012 at 9:29 AM

Re: “Conversation is the reason for an arts festival

Good post, thoughtful comments. This is why I'm tuned to ETV radio in the morning. ETV has been doing this for years in a program called Spoleto Today, hosted by a former Spoleto Festival general manager, Marc Overton. Most of the people mentioned in your article have appeared on the program, usually before they performed. And the great thing is that these conversations reach the whole state, so everyone can participate. I'm not shilling for the radio (and I almost never watch ETV television) but this is one thing they do right when Spoleto is in town.

1 of 1 people like this.
Posted by Ecuiram LeVar on June 6, 2012 at 8:52 AM

Re: “Monologist Mike Daisey's painful odyssey through the new media machine

The International Business Times has nothing kind to say about this piece: http://www.ibtimes.com/articles/347023/201…

4 of 4 people like this.
Posted by mat catastrophe on June 5, 2012 at 7:02 PM

Re: “Monologist Mike Daisey's painful odyssey through the new media machine

You seem to have quite a talent for missing the point, Patrick.

1 of 1 people like this.
Posted by arteear01 on June 5, 2012 at 1:06 AM
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