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Re: “A [redacted] interview with Top Chef's Tom Colicchio and Gail Simmons

Who gives a flying _____.

1 of 4 people like this.
Posted by Jaxx on June 4, 2016 at 5:00 PM

Re: “S.C. Brewers Guild director in D.C. to lobby for lower brewery taxes

@mat - A simple visit and conversation would reveal the info that they are in a growth mode.

A simple visit would not reveal the kind of in-depth cost analysis you're looking for.

Sorry if that wasn't clear. P.S. sweet moustache.

2 of 3 people like this.
Posted by ETimmonsP on June 3, 2016 at 4:52 PM

Re: “S.C. Brewers Guild director in D.C. to lobby for lower brewery taxes

"If your expectation was that, when asked for my opinion on Brook's efforts in DC yesterday, that I do a multi-week case-study on a specific beer in a specific brewery and break down all the costs involved, I'm sorry to disappoint you."

"A simple visit and conversation with any of them would reveal this info."

Oh, OK.

0 of 2 people like this.
Posted by mat catastrophe on June 3, 2016 at 12:38 PM

Re: “S.C. Brewers Guild director in D.C. to lobby for lower brewery taxes

"Would anyone care to actually do the math based on Pettigrew's numbers and figure out if brewers could actually afford to hire more people with lower taxes? Or, wait, is this about profit margins?"

The tax rates aren't "my numbers." They are the tax rates. Breweries have different costs of production based on where they are, how big they are, etc., and that cost is going to vary from batch-to-batch based on ingredients, packaging, etc. $5 is a common price for a pint in a brewery's taproom, but even that is not universal. It just helps illustrate that $0.13 isn't as paltry a sum as it might sound.

If your expectation was that, when asked for my opinion on Brook's efforts in DC yesterday, that I do a multi-week case-study on a specific beer in a specific brewery and break down all the costs involved, I'm sorry to disappoint you.

The reality is that ALL of the brewers in Charleston are in a growth mode. I won't link you to multiple articles about expansions, etc. A simple visit and conversation with any of them would reveal this info.

Here are some links that might help. I personally wouldn't trust anything called "Pettigrew's numbers" either. Sounds like a terrible prog rock band.

http://www.beerinstitute.org/policy-issues…

http://www.beerinstitute.org/policy-issues…

3 of 3 people like this.
Posted by ETimmonsP on June 3, 2016 at 8:46 AM

Re: “S.C. Brewers Guild director in D.C. to lobby for lower brewery taxes

Okay, I'll bite.

"The main talking point of the booze lobby is economic; they would reinvest a tax cut into their businesses. What business, booze or otherwise, would not say that?"

They all would. Of course they would. Is the argument here that brewers shouldn't act as businesses? Or that businesses shouldn't act in their own self-interest? Does not compute.

"Their federal tax was reduced in 1977 to $7/barrel for the first 60,000/year."

There were 96 breweries in this country in 1977. There were 4,269 last year. The landscape of this industry is completely different than it was 40 years ago. The dollars, voice, and support for craft beer is such that it's time to revisit this issue. Just because we've had inflation, does that mean the current excise tax rates are "right"? Are you suggesting the wise men that dreamed up $7/barrel 40 years ago foresaw the 45-fold increase in breweries that would occur over the next 40 years? Methinks not.

"The small brewers focus on more alcoholic 'craft' beers."

This belies ignorance of the craft category. We in SC underwent a (thankfully temporary) "high-gravity" craze after Pop the Cap, but craft brewers produce a huge range of styles, with a huge range of ABVs. Some of the most popular styles right now - session pales/IPAs, Berliner Weisse, Gose, etc. - are even less than 5% ABV. Regardless, craft brewers seek to bring creativity and choice to a market of adults that can legally consume it. Again, the basis of your argument is confusing, and is starting to have inklings of neo-Prohibition...

"It could scuttle a trade agreement that the US is negotiating with the European Union. It would also invite retaliation by other countries."

Do you have a source for this? Or is this just conjecture? Are we now arguing that there should be no change in any federal tax or regulation affecting domestic business without a entirely equal change in tax/regulation affecting foreign businesses in the same space?

Regardless, the act also decreases the excise tax on imports. If anyone is interested in the specifics:

http://www.beerinstitute.org/policy-issues…

Barry Clark, you have a bright future with AB InBev.

3 of 3 people like this.
Posted by ETimmonsP on June 3, 2016 at 8:37 AM

Re: “Summerville can't squeeze the facts out of sweet tea's murky history

I am 51 and from Savannah GA. My Grandma was from inland Southern GA and born in 1912..she taught me to make Iced Tea when I was about 6, standing on a stool at the stove, waiting for that point just before it boiled to turn the (gas) burner off. Then she made me wait while it steeped. While it was still warm, the tea was poured into a glass pitcher with a metal knife inside to absorb the heat and keep the pitcher from cracking. Sugar was added, it was briskly stirred, then cold water added. Then it was poured over ice. As a kid, if you ordered tea, it was brought to you sweet unless you specified otherwise. The "sweet tea" thing came about with the movie "Steel Magnolias." Grandma told me her Grandma taught her to make it. She also told me that because most of the water on the coast of GA, SC AND northern FL and sevwral counties inland) had the sulphur taste to it (well water), brewed tea with sugar added helped to hide the taste and encourage people to drink more to keep from "passing out in the heat of Summer." I have lived and traveled all over the US and Europe as an Army Wife and I can tell ya that Iced Tea (sweet tea by today's venacular) truly is better with coastal well water. I have a crew building our pool now, I have made approximately 50 gallons in the past 3 weeks. Not as sweet as I was taught and I went decaf in the 90's, but everyone loves my tea. I keep a 2 gallon dispenser in the fridge during the Summer. And I always think of Grandma when I make it. I adored her, miss her and thank her for teaching me well, at a young age...

1 of 1 people like this.
Posted by Belle South on June 2, 2016 at 11:25 PM

Re: “S.C. Brewers Guild director in D.C. to lobby for lower brewery taxes

"If a pint is $5, and profit margins are thin, that's a significant chunk."

See, I love pieces like this, where it looks like there's math involved because there's numbers, but there's really no math involved. Just the usual vague crap about profit margins. Oh, and hiring people. Or something.

Would anyone care to actually do the math based on Pettigrew's numbers and figure out if brewers could actually afford to hire more people with lower taxes? Or, wait, is this about profit margins?

Goddamn, must be all this beer, I can't even think straight.

2 of 5 people like this.
Posted by mat catastrophe on June 2, 2016 at 11:12 PM

Re: “S.C. Brewers Guild director in D.C. to lobby for lower brewery taxes

From the article: “Opening a brewery is the new American dream and the quintessential American success story,” says Bristow. “Day in and day out, South Carolina brewers are creating jobs, as well as innovative products that are transforming communities through economic development.”

The main talking point of the booze lobby is economic; they would reinvest a tax cut into their businesses. What business, booze or otherwise, would not say that? Most brewers already have a tax break. Their federal tax was reduced in 1977 to $7/barrel for the first 60,000/year. According to the beer lobby, 98% of the brewers produce less than that amount. Large brewers pay $18/barrel. Inflation has reduced the effective tax rates.

The small brewers focus on more alcoholic “craft” beers. For example, Bristow displays a large picture on his website of “Pirate Bomb,” a beer with 13% alcohol. It seems the plan is to grow alcohol consumption. If increased employment is the objective, there are better alternatives, such as a tax break for new hiring, for all businesses.

The US charges lower alcohol excise taxes on small to medium domestic producers than on imports. The proposed law would further tilt the playing field against imports. It could scuttle a trade agreement that the US is negotiating with the European Union. It would also invite retaliation by other countries.

0 of 5 people like this.
Posted by Barry Clark on June 2, 2016 at 7:17 PM

Re: “A [redacted] interview with Top Chef's Tom Colicchio and Gail Simmons

michford10 did you email Bravo? Try contacting them again at TopChefCharleston@gmail.com.

3 of 5 people like this.
Posted by Kinsey Gidick on June 2, 2016 at 8:38 AM

Re: “A [redacted] interview with Top Chef's Tom Colicchio and Gail Simmons

I was trying to qualify to be a diner because I'm a inspiring culinary student. I'm so jealous and wish this was me :(

2 of 5 people like this.
Posted by michford10 on June 1, 2016 at 9:25 PM

Re: “The case against Waffle House

Anthony Bourdain himself has said that he has left his FOOD SHOW days behind. That is, Parts Unknown is NOT a food show. It is not meant to replace No Reservations. The title is specifically NOT food related. He travels around the world to explore CULTURE. Culture covers politics, class, race, religion, military coups, economy, education, and FOOD. (This is even mentioned in the show when he dines with that grain guy. Food in and of itself is not the point. It is what it represents.)

Food is but ONE of this topics; it is no longer, by his own admission and preference, his MAIN topic on the show, and he has explicitly said that -- ON THE SHOW (another episode). The Waffle House episode is, therefore, NOT an episode about the "best quality places to eat at in Charleston." Given that his show is an exploration of culture, you see what? Him hanging out in unfancy bars, talking to locals; him eating on someone's porch, talking to locals; him watching one of God's blessed foods of the South being preserved and made by a master (BBQ), and talking to locals. And the locals take him to Waffle House, to talk about how WH is a part of the South.

Sean totally acknowledges, nay, UNDERSCORES that WH food is NOT GOOD FOR YOU or HIGH QUALITY. That isn't the point. It is beloved by LOCALS, and it is distinctly AMERICAN and SOUTHERN. Three concepts, all in caps, that are the heart and soul of the purpose of this specific episode, entirely in keeping with the mission of the show: to explore CULTURE. Remember, we're on CNN. We're not on the Food Network. We're not watching Top Chef. We're watching a foodie and chef who has found a spectacular niche between food appreciation and journalism and who has turned his explorations into an art form. Which takes you away from "the best place to eat in this city we are visiting" to "who are the people of this city, what makes them tick, what are their ways, how are they preserving them, how are they demonstrating this, and oh look, are we not seeing that very story told in the food they eat, why they eat it, where they eat it and how they prepare it?" I don't see you whining about how they drove out into the boonies to eat at an unassuming BBQ pit. There are a bajillion other BBQ spots that may even be more well-known or fancy, right? Why is this one special? Yes, it's delicious. It's also bad for you. But it's *preserving a way of life and culture that is fast fading*. Is WH not worthy of the same description?

Also, I f*cking love Waffle House. I am not even from the South. Half of my family is, but I was born in CA and raised abroad and the minute I found out a Southern restaurant specializing in waffles and open 24 hours existed, I went on the hunt. When I was 23 and happened to be on vacation in Miami, FL, I drove to the only one available south of Miami, (HOURS), in advance of a HURRICANE, to get to one. And it was GLORIOUS. Everything was flavorful and on point. You can't predict for that at every WH, the one Anthony and Sean eat at clearly has an issue with making their waffles properly crispy, but that was my first experience and it was WORTH THE DRIVE. Simple fare, low prices, great service, delicious food, open 24/7. If that isn't worthy of love, I don't know what is. Fast forward -- every time I'm in the south, EVERY time, I find the nearest one and we hit it. As many times as we care to. I have converted MULTIPLE northerners to the Waffle House's ways, and I'm not even FROM the south, yo.

If THAT doesn't represent the very point and essence of this segment of this episode, where Sean converts Anthony and Anthony understands the value of the WH, and its value to Southern CULTURE ... I don't know what does.

1 of 1 people like this.
Posted by blackgirlabroad on June 1, 2016 at 5:03 PM

Re: “Le Farfalle hosts job fair this week

Nope, def do not want to work there under any circumstances. I do however, want to eat there as much as humanly possible when here. I think they should contact me immediately and have me taste test every single item on the menu prior to opening. I am terribly critical if the food is not up to par, am not concerned with kitchen diplomacy like most food critiques here and I ate brunch at the Perla Cafe before returning 2 weeks ago so I am more than qualified. Mr & Mrs. T, Contact me ASAP as I think we should begin immediately.

5 of 5 people like this.
Posted by CIACulinaryKid on June 1, 2016 at 2:55 PM

Re: “RESTAURANT REVIEW: Alair Bistro

Yeah, that's what I got for not advertising with you - you pay the fee, or you get a 'D'. The Charleston City Paper shakedown... Posted by the former owner, Ray Noble. In the long run, I'm glad I never gave you a stinking dime. Your opinion wasn't worth even that, knowing it was always for sale.

0 of 2 people like this.
Posted by Ray Noble on May 31, 2016 at 9:23 PM

Re: “Killer views, cocktails, and bar snacks are the main draw at The Watch

Great article and photos of food, but who would want to dine with those nasty looking men!???

1 of 2 people like this.
Posted by LocalCitizen on May 30, 2016 at 4:56 PM

Re: “Sean Brock's fine dining institution McCrady's announces move

Is the City Paper lamenting that we're not getting yet another fast/casual burger joint? Did you have to walk more than 50 feet to one or something?

7 of 7 people like this.
Posted by factoryconnection on May 30, 2016 at 2:10 PM
Posted by OnTheMark on May 30, 2016 at 11:05 AM

Re: “Sean Brock's fine dining institution McCrady's announces move

"Tourists in droves is not what Charleston needs. Back! Back from whence you came!"

Southern hospitality at its finest!

5 of 9 people like this.
Posted by Mark Ritter on May 29, 2016 at 4:04 PM

Re: “It's all about the window-framed raw bar at The Darling

I don't quite understand why Ms. Wolf advertised the exclusivity of The Darling. I had no problem getting into the establishment, and I'm no affluent figure of society. I had a delectable experience and although I do not see myself indulging in this place again, I thoroughly enjoyed the service, ambience, and flavors of my experience. I don't want the general public to sway from such a kind place as this for fear of being tamely rejected. As always, quite an article. Thank you for entertaining my eyes and tastebuds, and for the laughs, Ms. Wolf. You never cease to amuse me.

2 of 2 people like this.
Posted by Katie Ridgway on May 27, 2016 at 9:22 PM

Re: “Sean Brock's fine dining institution McCrady's announces move

Tourists in droves is not what Charleston needs. Back! Back from whence you came!

9 of 20 people like this.
Posted by Caroline SwagnifiCent Jenkins on May 27, 2016 at 2:57 PM

Re: “UPDATED: Sidi Limehouse reacts to closure of his Rosebank Farms produce stand

The stand is open now!!

1 of 1 people like this.
Posted by Zahia Bird on May 27, 2016 at 11:18 AM
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