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Comment Archives: Stories: Food+Drink

Posted by Brenda Jennifer Peart on August 27, 2015 at 9:20 PM

Re: “Does traditional Gullah cuisine offer the way forward for Charleston fine dining?

The goal, imho, should be to verse oneself in as many cuisines as possible and develop something that is unique to the area.
The GG cuisine should act as one of the main influences (perhaps as organizer of the others), but "importing slow-smoked brisket from Texas, hand-crafting Mexican street food, churning out basket after basket of deep-fried chicken" is a very good thing as well.
First, though, we must ingest (ahem) these disparate influences, and them we can make them ours.

0 of 1 people like this.
Posted by liamBees on August 27, 2015 at 8:00 PM

Re: “Four sisters recall Charleston's food scene, before and after segregation

One of the best articles I've ever read from CCP.
Nice work, very nice work indeed!

Posted by Julian Hoppy Hopkins on August 27, 2015 at 12:30 PM

Re: “Four sisters recall Charleston's food scene, before and after segregation

I enjoyed this article until the last couple of paragraphs.

"For decades blacks have been pushed out of their homes and neighborhoods so property that was once owned by blacks is now owned by whites" is just a malicious way of saying black people sold their homes to white people.

And "Koreans have Koreatowns, Chinese people have their areas. Same for Jewish people and Italians. No reason we couldn't do the same. It's just going to take us coming together to make it happen" sounds an awful lot like an endorsement for returning to segregation.

9 of 13 people like this.
Posted by Jaxx on August 26, 2015 at 3:28 PM

Re: “Fish sandwich cabarets shaped Charleston's culinary history

Very cool! Didn't know that history and gives me much respect for those trying to recreate that success like chef BJ Dennis!

2 of 3 people like this.
Posted by Ryan Vevon Rapaport on August 26, 2015 at 3:28 PM

Re: “A coffee cretin gets schooled at the Counter Culture training center

This is the under appreciated thread of the year.

Posted by mat catastrophe on August 25, 2015 at 9:54 PM

Re: “A coffee cretin gets schooled at the Counter Culture training center

Unfortunately, yirgacheffe coffee's, even naturals. tend to be very, very tea-like. I'm more interested in coffee's that offer flavors that coffee is best at providing.
If you can find them, the harrar region can produce excellent coffee. LIkewise, Yemen can produce tremendous brews(dragonfly has a wonderful yemen right now that is truly exotic).
Lastly, look for naturals (that is unwashed/unpulped) beans. These are beans that have been picked, and the fruit was allowed to ferment while attached to the bean. It can impart massive amounts of flavor.

Posted by liamBees on August 25, 2015 at 5:42 PM

Re: “It's tot time: Parlor Deluxe opens Thursday, here's the menu

Ha. No problem, Jaxx. :)

1 of 1 people like this.
Posted by Sam Spence on August 25, 2015 at 4:25 PM

Re: “It's tot time: Parlor Deluxe opens Thursday, here's the menu

now my post looks weird. thanks ccp

Posted by Jaxx on August 25, 2015 at 3:56 PM

Re: “It's tot time: Parlor Deluxe opens Thursday, here's the menu

What does this title mean?

Posted by jeb on August 25, 2015 at 2:14 PM

Re: “Tattooed Moose Johns Island opens Aug. 25

Drove by there about an hour ago. Parking lot was pretty full. Wishing them luck!!!

Posted by kma71 on August 25, 2015 at 1:38 PM

Re: “It's tot time: Parlor Deluxe opens Thursday, here's the menu

If I made $84 an hour I could afford an $11 hot dog.

1 of 2 people like this.
Posted by Jaxx on August 25, 2015 at 1:12 PM

Re: “It's tot time: Parlor Deluxe opens Thursday, here's the menu

This looks pricey. How are those poor urban people supposed to eat there.

1 of 1 people like this.
Posted by Neil Carter on August 24, 2015 at 7:32 PM

Re: “It's tot time: Parlor Deluxe opens Thursday, here's the menu

Beautiful space, but you gotta sell a butt-load of over-priced dogs and tots to cover that build-out and overhead. Good luck, but I don't see it happening.

5 of 5 people like this.
Posted by Ima Oldman on August 24, 2015 at 5:24 PM

Re: “Where to plan your fantasy football draft party in Charleston

I once went to a bar during one of these draft parties. I've seen less homoerotic behavior at Pantheon.

1 of 2 people like this.
Posted by Ron Liberte on August 21, 2015 at 9:39 PM

Re: “Where to plan your fantasy football draft party in Charleston

Royal American. Why would you even consider doing it somewhere else??

0 of 1 people like this.
Posted by landsnark on August 21, 2015 at 8:23 PM

Re: “A coffee cretin gets schooled at the Counter Culture training center

Dunkin...the finest of all coffee. A rich deep "arresting" aroma, almost a blue tint to the fine oily top and always accompanied by H. Simpson's Breakfast of Champions choice. Slurping? Puh-lease, the CCPD's been doing that for years with Dunkin.

3 of 4 people like this.
Posted by CIACulinaryKid on August 21, 2015 at 5:30 PM

Re: “A coffee cretin gets schooled at the Counter Culture training center

My boss is trying to teach me about the finer things in coffee life, but alas, I remain not picky and perfectly tolerant of coffee that comes in a K-cup!
Thank you for writing this article, I feel much better about being a coffee cretin, and also learned more about what I'd be looking for if I could break out of my cretinitude and become a coffee snob... er... gourmet? expert? something like that. :)

0 of 1 people like this.
Posted by fmdays on August 21, 2015 at 3:00 PM

Re: “A coffee cretin gets schooled at the Counter Culture training center

>Light roasts often run under-developed, bringing grassy flavors into your coffee that have no business there.

This certainly can be true and I would say was mostly true in the early 2000's, however, there are now many roasters that are able to roast lightly and still ensure enough development so that grassy flavors are not present. Of course, this requires a lot of data-tracking and cupping on the part of the roaster. Try some light roasts from George Howell, for example. His coffees typically display bright and floral characteristics while still delivering gummy sweetness and leaving out flavors associated with dry-distillation (carbonization). If you are a roaster you may be interested in finding published roast curves on Cropster from "light" roasters such as Tim Wendelboe or Marshall Hance.

>Single beans can give you amazing accordion solos, but that's not so helpful when you prefer listening to symphonies.

I would also disagree with this point. Roasting lightly aids in the preservation of volatile aromatics and CGA in coffee, which when hydrolyzed in brewing, creates complex flavors in the cup. CGA formation has a tipping point during the roasting process, however, and we see CGA actually being destroyed in longer, higher-temperature, "darker" roasts. On a side note, I don't think an argument can be made that darker roasts actually carry more flavor compounds on a molecular level, since carbonization destroys these compounds and creates carbon, which tastes like charcoal. Furthermore I would argue that blending decreases extraction capabilities unless a roaster is making sure that their blend components are all within a general range of solubility (basically, no one component can be extracted optimally because they all extract at variable rates). On top of these points a blend does not aid in consistency when making small amounts of coffee (such as espresso) as such a small sample of individual beans from may not be indicative of the larger population (statistically, a small n is more likely to be erroneous in its representation).


>This is the big lie behind the single origin hoopla.

I would implore you to refrain calling another school of thought on roasting "hoopla" as it is simply a preference shared by a group of people. Besides, the single origin mentality is a positive celebration of the farmer and of coffee as an agricultural product. It is part of a larger culinary movement that aims to glorify ingredients rather than chefs.

> As such, roasting only light roasts is just as limiting and problematic as only doing dark roasts.

Here I will make a case against the inherent dichotomy of using terms such as "light" and "dark". Rather than being one who "roasts dark" or "roasts light" I believe it is more helpful to be one that does as little as possible to bring out what the coffee has to offer.

Of course, these are all my own thoughts and ways of thinking. To me there is nothing morally wrong with someone drinking a "dark" coffee or preferring that over a "light" coffee, and of course, my aim here is simply to be apologetic and not polemic.

9 of 10 people like this.
Posted by MM 1 on August 19, 2015 at 7:06 PM

Re: “Cumberland Street Smokehouse is now open

Ate there Saturdy night! The BBQ was mediocre at best! The squash casserole was good! The sauces were nasty! The manager was a complete asshole!!! The two lesbians at the bar were cool! Our waitress was adorable!!! Would NOT recommend for a place to eat!!! In Charleston, you have to stand out and treat your customers with respect...Cumberland Smokehouse FAILS miserably!!!

Posted by killy2165 on August 19, 2015 at 10:46 AM
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