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Comment Archives: Stories: News+Opinion: Haire of the Dog

Re: “Gullah cuisine, genetics, and Michael Twitty's beef with Sean Brock

"In a new Penn State study, researchers found that people who possessed variants of the taste receptor gene TAS2R—including the TAS2R38 variant, which is present in about 25% of the population—were much more sensitive to bitter flavors. In this case, they showed an aversion to hoppier beers, but TAS2R38 has also been linked to distaste for bitter veggies, too. In one previous study, people with the gene variant consumed an average of 200 fewer servings of veggies per year."

http://www.prevention.com/food/healthy-eat…

As everybody knows, gene TAS2R has been traced to the first alien cultures through ancient Egypt, as if it were a marker to identify the chosen people. One day those of us who hate broccoli and IPAs will be your overlords. Think of us as the first meta-humans.

2 of 2 people like this.
Posted by Fish Pimp on April 4, 2016 at 4:29 PM

Re: “Gullah cuisine, genetics, and Michael Twitty's beef with Sean Brock

Storm in a teacup. History is full of people who didn't "get the credit and success they deserve." For nearly every successful person or organization there is some person or group claiming that credit was stolen from them.

If a white person wrote all this DNA stuff he would be called a Nazi eugenics nutjob, so turnabout is fair play. Either we are all biologically equal as humans or we are not.

7 of 11 people like this.
Posted by Cid95 on April 4, 2016 at 11:46 AM

Re: “Gullah cuisine, genetics, and Michael Twitty's beef with Sean Brock

Let me see if I understand what you're saying, Phil--African-Americans are the only ones who should be talking about their food history.

I agree with you that there is a dearth of African-American faces and talent in the F&B industry here and I do think it's about time that they have a place at the table, so to speak. But to say that African-Americans are the only ones who should be talking about their foodways, I think is shortsighted.

I am a Living Historian. For the past 20 1/2 years, I've been privileged to educate folks about slavery history (which includes food and foodways). I'd never had a lot of these foods until coming here (I'm from off), and they were a marvelous discovery. I've always given African-Americans full credit and kudos.

4 of 4 people like this.
Posted by weavingdreams on April 4, 2016 at 11:13 AM

Re: “Gullah cuisine, genetics, and Michael Twitty's beef with Sean Brock

After reading this poorly conceived, poorly researched, poorly reasoned and poorly written (not to mention poorly edited; despite the author’s grand profession of his editing bona fides at the beginning of the piece, there are at least 10 glaring grammatical and word choice errors that wouldn’t pass muster with an editor worth his or her salt) diatribe/hit piece, it’s hard to know where to begin in criticizing it.

I’ll start here: portraying Michael Twitty as some kind of histrionic, overdramatic snake-oil salesman just waiting for a fainting couch when he is criticized is deeply unfair and inaccurate, at best a flawed reading of his scholarship in Southern foodways and at worst a purposeful misrepresentation. Yes, Twitty puts a lot of stock in DNA results, but at no point does he suggest that DNA equals destiny; in fact, it is a starting place for researching your family history, not an endpoint, and Twitty has used that information to painstakingly trace his own family history, which is difficult, slow work, especially for those who descended from the enslaved. His writing is tough and uncompromising, yes, but it’s also a lot more nuanced than most other writing around the subject.

And speaking of histrionic, the author’s comparison of Twitty’s belief in DNA research to the National Socialists (that’s the Nazis, folks, even though he cravenly tries to walk it back a bit) is cowardly, and considering Twitty’s conversion to Judaism, deeply inappropriate.

But it all comes back to this: Yes, it’s important that the African and African-American food story be told, but it damn sure also matters who tells it. The history of Southern cuisine, which Charleston has turned into a multi-multi-million dollar industry catering to a high-end tourist clientele, is inextricably tied to the history of the African American hands that made the food for the White mouths that ate it.

The descendants of those cooks are conspicuously absent in the telling of the story of Southern cuisine, and THAT’S the crux of Twitty’s argument. There might not be a “cooking gene” but there is a long line of cooks in African American families who have had that spirit, and those recipes, passed down from hand to hand and generation to generation. But those voices aren’t heard, and more to the point, those hands aren’t making the food, or getting much of a slice of the money, that flows into Charleston and other cities that are seeking that tourist trade.

And that, Chris, is what cultural appropriation is all about. And I get that there are programs in the schools that are helping students, especially African American students, learn about cooking, and that’s good, but it’s essentially a rain check. There are great chefs of color NOW who can’t get a foothold in Charleston for whatever reason — lack of access to venture capital, lack of notice in the media, lack of connections or lack of networking opportunities. And as much as you want to point to the future, this is a problem that has to be dealt with in the present, and no, it’s not easy. But it’s necessary. And that’s why we need people like Michael Twitty.

20 of 26 people like this.
Posted by Phil Lueck on April 3, 2016 at 3:17 AM

Re: “Gullah cuisine, genetics, and Michael Twitty's beef with Sean Brock

Excellent article, Chris. I have a dear friend who's one incredible cook (she makes the best fried chicken I've ever put in my mouth). But because she has not graduated from some uppity culinary school, she doesn't get much credit for what she does.

As far as the African and African-American food story goes, what's the most important thing is that the story is told. It doesn't matter by whom. Just that the info gets out there.

7 of 16 people like this.
Posted by weavingdreams on April 2, 2016 at 4:04 PM

Re: “I don't know about you, I'm voting for Trump's penis

CIACulinaryKid:

The plural of penis is "pingu".

1 of 1 people like this.
Posted by Pronghorn on March 9, 2016 at 9:17 PM

Re: “I don't know about you, I'm voting for Trump's penis

Oh, NOW the Republicans want us to vote for the guy with the biggest dick.

4 of 4 people like this.
Posted by TROLLSLAYER on March 9, 2016 at 9:05 PM

Re: “I don't know about you, I'm voting for Trump's penis

I think of all politicians regardless of gender as big penises, or is it penii or penes? Mr. Pimp, you have a wealth of penis knowledge, do you know the proper plural?

5 of 5 people like this.
Posted by CIACulinaryKid on March 9, 2016 at 6:36 PM

Re: “I don't know about you, I'm voting for Trump's penis

Jenny has no penis and obviously no idea that there are independents running, also.

1 of 1 people like this.
Posted by Showmoor on March 9, 2016 at 12:15 PM

Re: “I don't know about you, I'm voting for Trump's penis

Hitler had a micro-penis. And one of testicles failed to drop.

2 of 2 people like this.
Posted by Fish Pimp on March 7, 2016 at 11:38 PM

Re: “The P&C's editorial board is cowardly at best, complicit at worst

and here i thought you had posted to ignore me!?!!

Please resume the ignorance. I rather enjoy silence from you.

1 of 3 people like this.
Posted by artrogue on March 4, 2016 at 8:46 AM

Re: “The tragic but undeniable truth about Scott Weiland and Stone Temple Pilots

I find this article to be terribly written by someone with absolutely NOT A DROP OF CLASS! TO WRITE THIS ARTICLE THE SAME DAY SCOTT WIELAND DIES FROM AN OVERDOSE....ONLY shows what a cold-hearted, money hungry piranha this creep is. You couldn't even wait until his family and friends had the chance to absorb the terribly sad news they've been given to deal with? You are the most judgemental piece of S**T I've ever heard from? Go judge your own life...I GUARANTEE It won't be nearly as interesting, exciting, fulfilling, or touching as that of Scott Wieland! Haters like you LOVE LOVE LOVE to put down accomplished people or bands, so you can, in some way, shape, or form, make your unsuccessful existence feel worthwhile! Get your own Life LOSER!!!

8 of 8 people like this.
Posted by Emily Majerle on March 2, 2016 at 7:24 PM

Re: “The P&C's editorial board is cowardly at best, complicit at worst

No, my friend, the jumpsuit's association with Gitmo is why they use it for their propaganda. So, yeah, you're wrong when you post a quote saying it's incidental to their propaganda. It's front and center.

4 of 5 people like this.
Posted by Pat Hendrix on March 1, 2016 at 8:39 PM

Re: “The P&C's editorial board is cowardly at best, complicit at worst

"Pat, Our very existence is a recruiting tool for Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi'.

Closing Guantanamo is not going to have any effect on the growth of those bastards.
The color of the jumpsuits is a ridiculous point. In reality, orange has not been used on the base since 2006 but that has not mattered to them in the least. Nor will the location of the prisoners.

The closing of the base is purely the politics of our President."

You make the absolute worst arguments for things when you don't cut and paste. If your argument is that the base closing is purely political, and has no effect on recruiting among militant Muslims, then why oppose the base closing?

If you have some other reason not to close the base, you're certainly not giving it. It sounds like you just want these people detained for no other reason than you "think" they're guilty of something.

Now, if you have any respect - at all - for the American traditions you claim to hold dear, then you have to agree that criminals, both domestic and foreign, should get a day in court. That's supposed to be something we all believe in - The Rule Of Law - and if you're being wishy-washy about it, maybe you should think about that.

So, if it isn't trials you want for the remaining detainees, what is it? Is it just never ending punishment? For crimes they have not been tried for, and in some cases not charged? Is that the type of small-government, pro-freedom ideal that you'd like to see come right on over into this country?

Oh, is that it? You're afraid if they come to the mainland then maybe, just maybe, some of your crazier friends will start making noises about the "anti-cop black people" - and maybe they should be held without trial (protip: lots of people are already held in American jails, for years, without trials and some on sketchy charges or, as we've seen recently, for debts). Are you worried that your "anti-big government" rhetoric is going to sound even weaker as you're cheer leading people being sent off to the gulag?

Or is it just easier for you to allow the people currently held in Gitmo to stay there, because letting them go might mean the last and final insult of this whole, treacherous, bullshit War on Terror: that it was all for nothing. In the end, after hundreds of thousands have died and nations lain waste and our already terrible image in the Middle East permanently stained, that it was for absolutely fucking nothing? Is that the fear?

So, please tell us - in your own words - why you feel that Guantanamo should remain open (I'm assuming you also want it to remain open in Cuba).

3 of 4 people like this.
Posted by mat catastrophe on March 1, 2016 at 8:13 PM

Re: “The P&C's editorial board is cowardly at best, complicit at worst

Pat, Our very existence is a recruiting tool for Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi'.

Closing Guantanamo is not going to have any effect on the growth of those bastards.
The color of the jumpsuits is a ridiculous point. In reality, orange has not been used on the base since 2006 but that has not mattered to them in the least. Nor will the location of the prisoners.

The closing of the base is purely the politics of our President.

1 of 3 people like this.
Posted by artrogue on March 1, 2016 at 6:32 PM

Re: “The P&C's editorial board is cowardly at best, complicit at worst

Artrogue, there's a reason the Islamic State puts their prisoners in orange jumpsuits when they're paraded on camera to be used as propaganda tools. I'll give you one guess what it is.

2 of 6 people like this.
Posted by Pat Hendrix on March 1, 2016 at 1:41 PM

Re: “The P&C's editorial board is cowardly at best, complicit at worst

I'm more disappointed in the South Carolina dem party. I feel like they meddled in the primary unfairly. They gave Bernie zero chance to win. Pathetic. And I lost respect for one particular pol that I thought was truly a revolutionary- turns out he's just trying to move up.

10 of 14 people like this.
Posted by Curtis Brown on February 29, 2016 at 8:35 PM

Re: “The P&C's editorial board is cowardly at best, complicit at worst

The P&C did do its homework. It is you who has fallen for the Obama administration's
push to close the base on really what is just a pretext to justify a political decision.

"In Dabiq’s nine issues (the isis propaganda mag.), for example, the word “Guantanamo” appears just four times. “Israel,” “Jew,” and “Zion” together appear 133 times, and “Crusade,” 387. Even “Kashmir” and “India” together make ten appearances, while “Drone” shows up seven times. In the eighth issue of Dabiq, Guantanamo is only used in passing to mention that a mujahid was once held there. However, the world “hijrah,” or the call the immigrate to the Islamic State, is invoked 38 times. Considering that one of the four appearances of “Guantanamo” is in a footnote and that the other references appear almost incidental, it becomes obvious that Guantanamo is not a primary driver of ISIS’s English-language print propaganda."
https://www.lawfareblog.com

8 of 13 people like this.
Posted by artrogue on February 29, 2016 at 6:14 PM

Re: “The P&C's editorial board is cowardly at best, complicit at worst

I'm just needling Haire a bit; he redeemed himself with me when he refused to delete Hunter's disgusting columns.

4 of 7 people like this.
Posted by TROLLSLAYER on February 29, 2016 at 6:05 PM

Re: “The P&C's editorial board is cowardly at best, complicit at worst

Pronghorn is right, as per usual. Dwayne Green is a must-read out of morbid curiosity. His lack of command of persuasive language is awesome.

Jack Hunter is disgusting.

However, I'm surprised you're surprised, Chris, that a conservative editorial board is conservative and self-serving. Is it even noteworthy? However, what is noteworthy is your column made me thirsty and hungry. Let's go drink some liquor and eat some chicken?

3 of 6 people like this.
Posted by landsnark on February 29, 2016 at 6:03 PM
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