ACE of Basin
ACE of Basin

When you're at SEWE this weekend, make sure that you catch an exclusive screening of Common Ground: The Story of the ACE Basin by documentarian Bill Bailey. The film tells the story of how various individuals and organizations helped protect the ACE river basin, which stretches from Charleston to Beaufort, S.C. ACE is an acronym that stands for the defining rivers of the St. Helena Sound: the Ashepoo, Combahee, and Edisto. "These rivers were protected under a heroic conservation effort," Bailey says. — Cullen Lea


Dana Beach flocks to East Africa to photograph flamingos
Dana Beach flocks to East Africa to photograph flamingos Birds of a Feather

With its curved black bill, skinny pink legs, and long neck, the flamingo is certainly an odd-looking bird. Graceful and awkward, flamingos have been descending on the salty lakes of East Africa for 30 million years. And few Lowcountry residents know these creatures quite like Dana Beach. — Amy Mercer


Wildlife of the Party
Wildlife of the Party

Watching a bald eagle snatch a defenseless bunny with its talons on the boob tube can't compare to watching a bird of prey up close and personal. At least that's what David Hitzig, executive director of the Busch Wildlife Sanctuary, believes. — Joelle Pettus


Take Flight
Take Flight

It's not that often that you see falcon ride a thermal above Marion Square and dive toward the ground at 150 miles per hour (and no, we're not exaggerating). If that was a regular occurrence — and quite frankly, we're not even sure if there's ever been a single instance of that happening — we seriously doubt you'd see that many bikini-wearing sunbathers and their tiny dogs lounging about. The falcon is a bird of prey, after all. — Cullen Lea


Get in the pit with barbecue badass Jimmy Hagood
Get in the pit with barbecue badass Jimmy Hagood 'Cue Captain

Jimmy Hagood has won barbecue competitions all over the Southeast, from his 2004 first place win at the North Carolina State Barbecue Championship to a 2002 Grand Championship accolade at the South Carolina State Barbecue Championship. But let's get one thing straight: His first competitive barbecue event was at the Southeastern Wildlife Expo some 20 years ago. On that day, Hagood walked away with a second place award for amateurs. Today he's one of the ultimate pit professionals, owner of Food for the Southern Soul, BlackJack Barbecue, and Tidewater Foods & Catering. This year, he's coming back to SEWE to present his very own Cue Camp to eager participants. — Kinsey Gidick


Jim and Jamie Dutcher ran with the wolves
Jim and Jamie Dutcher ran with the wolves Don't Be Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf

I'm charging Little Red Riding Hood and the Three Little Pigs with defamation. For years their libelous fables have portrayed wolves in a false light. I'd also like to call to the stand Stephanie Meyer for propagating the myth of the werewolf in her Twilight series. Tweens nationwide are now convinced that a simple camping trip could lead to a romantic tryst with a chiseled wolf boy. Thanks Steph, I can't wait to see what questions that'll raise in health class. — Kinsey Gidick


It's Ducks Unlimited Season
It's Ducks Unlimited Season

If you didn't make it to the Lowcountry Oyster Festival a few weeks back, have no fear. On Feb. 18, you'll have another chance to get your oyster fix at SEWE's Ducks Unlimited Oyster Roast. All-you-can-eat oysters will be the star of the event, but if you're not a mollusk lover, there will also be a down-home Lowcountry cookout from 6 to 8 p.m., featuring pulled-pork barbecue, shrimp and grits, venison chili, and Southern fried catfish. — Brandi Ross


Lords of Nature studies the impact of predators on their habitats
Lords of Nature studies the impact of predators on their habitats Predator

Every grade-schooler knows quite clearly that big, scary carnivorous animals eat the smaller, weaker animals, who in turn eat other smaller things, who in turn eat even tinier animals, who in turn eat microscopic animals, who, given the right conditions, can turn around and eat, well, about anything they damn well please, including the bigger prey. Those bacteria are crafty buggers after all. — Susan Cohen


Game On
Game On

For the second year in a row at SEWE, local chefs will show attendees how to cook with game, as well as Certified South Carolina Grown products. Jimmy Huggins, SEWE president and CEO, thinks the demonstrations will be popular again this year. "We like to offer a variety of interesting things for our guests. Showing off some of the Lowcountry's great chefs preparing food with delicious South Carolina products seemed like a great idea," he says. — Brys Stephens


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